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Unit 10 Imperialism in the Far East Reading--Questions.doc...

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Imperialism in the Far EastSean BrennanBrecksville-Broadview Heights High SchoolOverviewThis lesson will take one to two class periods to implement and will be incorporated into a larger uniton imperialism from 1800 through 1914. In this lesson students will come to understand the economic, politicaland social motivations for Japanese industrialization in the 19thcentury and its impending implications forChina, Taiwan and Korea in the 20thcentury. Students will be provided with a worksheet that includes a basichistory of Japan, China, Korea and Taiwan during the Age of Imperialism. Embedded in strategic locations area photograph and several political cartoons that will ask the students to use what they have learned from thereading/unit and apply it to make conclusions based on the illustrations provided. Conclusions students willmake will include answers to the following: 1.) Why did Japan industrialize?, 2.) How were Japan’sindustrialization and imperialism linked?, 3.) Why was Japan able to colonize Korea, Taiwan and parts ofChina?, 4.) Which nations “got a slice” of China and why did this happen? and 5.) During the new Age ofImperialism Europeans and Americans often cited Social Darwinism and Kipling’s concept ofthe white man’sburdenas justifications for imperialism. How did the Japanese “import” these ideas to justify their own brandof imperialism?Goals/ObjectivesThis lesson will assist students achieving the following goals from the Modern World History Ohio ModelCurriculum for Social Studies (Revised November, 2011):By the early 20th century, many European nations as well as Japan extended their control over other lands and created empires.Their motivations had economic, political and social roots.The political motivations for imperialism included the desire to appear most powerful, bolster nationalistic pride and provide securitythrough the building of military bases overseas.

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Term
Spring
Professor
wood
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