NR505 Research Summary Paper - Running head RESEARCH...

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Running head: RESEARCH SUMMARY TABLE 1 Research Summary Table: Head injuries to children not wearing helmets Laura Costa Chamberlain College of Nursing NR505: Advance Research Methods: Evidence-Based Practice January 18, 2016
RESEARCH SUMMARY TABLE 2 Research Summary Table: Head injuries to children not wearing helmets Author (year) Purpose Sample/ Number of Participants Design Level of Evidence Findings Limitations Adams et al., (2014) To evaluate the effectiveness of a school helmet safety program in increasing helmet use, knowledge, and improving attitudes toward helmets use among school- aged children. A convenience sample size of (n=951) students from six local elementary. Descriptive study of students responses were received an analyzed using a Likert scale. Evidence from a single descriptive study. Students who participate in a helmet safety program are more likely to report an increase in helmet use, increase in helmet safety knowledge, and improvement in attitude toward helmet use than students who did not participate in the program Possibility of bias due to nonrandom assignment of school selection to study groups. Two classes consisted of advanced learning students. Some students in the control group may have already had helmet safety knowledge. Lastly, during a field trip, 5 th grade students participated in a similar helmet safety presentation, but did not receive free helmets. Graves et al., (2014) To evaluate the effect of public bicycle share programs (PBSP), on the frequency of bicycle-related head injuries A three-year study with a sample of (n=Ten cities). Comparison between cities with PBSP programs and those without of patients admitted to trauma centers with bicycle related injuries. Comparison study Implementation of a PBSP was associated with 14% greater risk of head injury among patients admitted to trauma centers for bicycle-related injuries. Not a population based study. Included patients only admitted to trauma centers. Other limitations included; follow-up time, post- implementation time was only 12 months Joseph et al., (2014) To determine the use of bicycle helmet in prevention of intra-cranial hemorrhage. A four-year cohort study. Sample size of (n= 864) patients Retrospective cohort analysis of all the patients who presented to our level 1 trauma center after a bicycle injury. Evidence from well-designed cohort study. Bicycle riders were less likely to have a scalp laceration, skull fracture, and a facial fracture compared to non- helmeted bicycle riders.

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