ENGS 05 Paper #2 (Mat#C1E6B

ENGS 05 Paper #2 (Mat#C1E6B - Nanotechnology and Cancer...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Nanotechnology and Cancer Treatment: Predictions for 2025 Matt Lewis Engs. 5 TA: Francisco Zincone
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Nanotechnology is driving advances in the treatment, detection, and diagnosis of all varieties of cancer. Treating cancer largely depends on early detection. If it is detected early enough, it can be treated by eliminating cancerous cells and preserving healthy ones. By the year 2025, many promising developments in nanotechnology research may provide new tools for caring for cancer patients. Nanosensors could be used to find cancer before it becomes too widespread to treat effectively. Other nanotools may allow for cancer cells to be precisely located, which may help chemotherapeutic drugs kill the right cells. Ultimately, nanotechnology may allow for a gradual merging of all aspects of cancer treatment into one simultaneously occurring step. Before this is to happen, the ethics of nanotechnology usage must be properly considered. Cancer: A Coming Cure? Cancer is a non-infectious disease that arises from the abnormal proliferation, migration, and invasion of cells in the human body. Genetic malfunctions cause accumulations of cells, which are called tumors (Alison and Sharraf, 2). Tumors possess the capacity to continue multiplying after the stimulus that caused tissue growth to occur (Alison and Sharraf, 2). Tissue growth is a normal cellular function, but cancerous growth is a relatively uncontrolled process whereby cells continue to multiply even after stimulation has ended. This kind of growth can be either malignant or benign (Alison and Sharraf, 2). Malignant tumors are considered cancerous, owing to their ability to invade local cells, proliferate at a rapid rate, and spread to distant parts of the body in “colonization.” The distribution of cancerous cells and destruction of healthy cells by cancerous ones cause death if not contained by treatment. As a non-infectious disease, the causes of cancer are not particularly important in
Background image of page 2
how it is currently treated. Cancer is basically a genetic disease. Mutations in the genetic code of a series of cells propel the unregulated growth that characterizes a tumor. There seem to be three factors that lead to the development of these mutations: nature, nurture, and luck (Alison and Sharraf, 46). Nature, or environmental risks, includes physical agents, chemical agents, and infectious agents such as viruses (Alison and Sharraf, 40). Since causes are so variable and often uncontrollable, early detection of a tumor is often the best method of treatment available. Cancer treatment, though, can be administered only once a malignant tumor has been identified. Identification generally unfolds in two phases. First, if a tumor exists, its location must be ascertained. In most cases, several imaging techniques can be applied to find the location and existence of a tumor. Tumors that arise near the surface of the body are easily found by spotting them with the naked eye (Alison and Sharraf, 3). But to find tumors in less accessible places, more sophisticated approaches must be employed. To
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 12

ENGS 05 Paper #2 (Mat#C1E6B - Nanotechnology and Cancer...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online