Toh Shan Zhen_SFTY 335_America Airlines Flight 191 - Module...

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Module 9 CASE STUDY ANALYSIS-AMERICA AIRLINES FLIGHT 191 TOH SHAN ZHEN 2413813 SUBMITTED TO: MR ANG TIONG KIOW DATE: 18 MAY 2016 1
Cause(s) of Accident American Airlines Flight 191 was a regularly scheduled flight from O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois, to Los Angeles International Airport on May 25, 1979. The aircraft involved was a McDonnell-Douglass DC-10-10, registered N110AA, which had logged close to 20 000 hours was powered by 3 of General Electric’s CF6-6D engines. A total of 258 passengers and 13 crew members were on board flight 191. Just 31 seconds into takeoff, American Airlines Flight 191 crashes into the trailer park near the airport, destroying five homes and killing two other people on the ground. Two other people on the ground suffered from serious injuries at the crash site. A total of 273 lives were lost in that crash, ranking as the worst single plane accident in the United States history, Through the investigations, the National Transport Safety Board (NTSB) had determined that the probable cause of American Airlines Flight 191 was the asymmetric stall and the ensuing roll following the uncommand retraction of the left wing outboard leading edge-slats. Upon takeoff, the engine on the left wing, together with the strut assembly and three feet of the wing leading edge, was separated from the aircraft as one unit, falling onto the runway. The separation of the unit caused a loss in hydraulic pressure, retraction of the slats outboard of the left engine as well as loss of electrical power provided by the engine’s electrical generator. All of these has resulted in the loss of many aircraft systems and instruments, including the captain's flight instruments, the left stall warning computer, the stick shaker (stall warning) motor, number 1 engine instruments, the slat disagree warning system, and parts of the flight control indicating system. 2
Structural and Mechanical Factors The attachment of the pylon to the wing is the use of the spherical ball joints in three different structural elements. One of the spherical joints is attached behind the forward bulkhead, transmitting thrust loads from the pylon structure into a thrust link, which in turn is connected through another spherical joint to structure on the lower surface of the wing. Two of the spherical joints are attached to the structure in the wing forward of the front spar, aligned vertically in a forward bulkhead. The third attachment point is a spherical joint in the pylon aft bulkhead, attaching to a clevis mounted on the underside of the wing.

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