Response6 - Amber Chambers Anthro 106 April 3, 2008...

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Unformatted text preview: Amber Chambers Anthro 106 April 3, 2008 Response Paper 6 As described in our textbook, gender is used in biological or cultural terms and refers to the culturally constructed schemas about gender. In other words, a person is either male or female. This view is only true of certain cultures. In cultures unlike our own, three or even four genders are recognized. Sex, on the other hand, is described in our textbook as the cultural constructions and elaborations of action and eroticism around the act of sexual intercourse. Westerners have been traditionally raised with the idea of sexual dimorphism, and idea that recognizes only two genders - male and female. This results from the common thought that the major roles of males and females is reproduction. Outside of our well- known Western culture however, thinking may be different and more than one gender may be recognized - an idea known as “gender variance” (Lang, 92). Each culture individualizes their thinking in regard to what comprises the roles, qualities, and activities...
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This note was uploaded on 04/23/2008 for the course ANTHRO 106 taught by Professor Harper during the Spring '08 term at UMass (Amherst).

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Response6 - Amber Chambers Anthro 106 April 3, 2008...

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