albinism - Paula Koren Human Anatomy and Physiology October...

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Paula Koren Human Anatomy and Physiology October 9, 2007 Normal skin pigmentation is determined by a person’s genetics, which determine the amount of melanin in his skin. Melanin levels obviously very anyway, as we can see by noticing the different colors of skin possessed by the world’s population. A condition which affects the skin pigmentation is albinism. Albinism is a dermatological disorder in which an individual’s body lacks pigment. It is a genetic condition, meaning that it is passed to offspring by their parents. It is also congenital, meaning that it can be seen and diagnosed at birth, rather than going unnoticed for a time before manifesting itself later in a person’s life. A person must have received a defective gene from each parent in order to have albinism. Often, the parents have no idea that they carry the albino gene. The do not notice because they have a pair of genes that control skin pigmentation. As long as one of the genes is normal, the gene that carries albinism will be recessive, allowing the parents to have normal pigmentation. However, when a child receives one such gene from each parent, he does not have a normal gene to produce any pigment, and therefore may have
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albinism - Paula Koren Human Anatomy and Physiology October...

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