Dominant and Recessive Traits

Dominant and Recessive Traits - Lauren McCain Bio-Processes...

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Lauren McCain Bio-Processes Dr. Whipple Dominant and Recessive Traits Sex link malady can be recessive or dominant traits. Most X-linked traits and disorders are usually recessive. A male usually always inherits an X-linked trait from his mother, who is a carrier of the recessive gene but is herself usually not affected. Color blindness is a X-linked trait. IF a female carrier and a man with normal vision have children, each of their daughteres has a 50% chance of receiving the mother’s affected X chromosome and of also being a carrier. Each son also has a 50% chance of receiving her affected chromosome but, because its effect is not neutralized by a normal X chromosome, he will be colorblind. When too many or to fewer chromosomes are present, abnormalities can occur. Many fetuses with chromosome abnormalities do not survive to birth. Babies who do survive may have varying degrees of mental and physical impairment or many not have any noticeable affects at all. Some chromosomes disorders, called syndromes, produce a combination of recognizable
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This note was uploaded on 04/24/2008 for the course BIOL 1101 taught by Professor Felicia during the Spring '08 term at GCSU.

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Dominant and Recessive Traits - Lauren McCain Bio-Processes...

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