Young Goodman Brown

Young Goodman Brown - Chris Brock Young Goodman Brown...

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Chris Brock November 3, 2002 Young Goodman Brown The story “Young Goodman Brown” written by Nathaniel Hawthorne, demonstrates obvious examples of irony. Hawthorne makes extensive use of irony by making the protagonist of the story so naïve. The main character of the story, Young Goodman Brown, succumbs to a great irony that forever changes his life, as well as to cleverly revealed underlying ironic situations. Young Goodman Brown’s gullibility causes him to believe that everyone is good, rather than evil. At the very beginning of the story, the young Puritan man departs from his wife, Faith, on a journey through the forest. The name of his wife alone was ironic in that later in the story she is being received into the group of devil worshippers. Not only is her name ironic, but also the description of her as “pretty” and as wearing “pink ribbons” because it implies youthful innocence and a cheerful outlook on life. When Young Goodman Brown began his journey into the forest, he met an older
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Young Goodman Brown - Chris Brock Young Goodman Brown...

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