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htmlcontinued-4 - Copyright 1999-2007 Ellis Horowitz 1 HTML...

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Unformatted text preview: Copyright 1999-2007 Ellis Horowitz 1 HTML Continued Copyright 1999-2007 Ellis Horowitz 2 The <LINK> Element Should only appear in the HEAD It may appear any number of times It conveys relationship information that may be rendered in a variety of ways (e.g., a tool-bar with a drop-down menu of links) Example - The current document is "Chapter2.html". The rel attribute specifies the relationship of the linked document with the current document. <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Chapter 2</TITLE> <LINK rel="Index" href="../index.html"> <LINK rel="Next" href="Chapter3.html"> <LINK rel="Prev" href="Chapter1.html"> </HEAD> ...the rest of the document... Copyright 1999-2007 Ellis Horowitz 3 How is <LINK> Used To provide a variety of information to search engines: Links to alternate versions of a document, written in another human language, e.g. <LINK lang="fr" title="La documentation en Français type="text/html" rel="alternate" hreflang="fr" href="http://domain/manual/french.html"> Links to alternate versions of a document, designed for different media <LINK media="print" title="The manual in postscript type="application/postscript" rel="alternate href="http://domain/manual/usermanual.ps"> Links to the starting page of a collection of documents. Copyright 1999-2007 Ellis Horowitz 4 <BASE> Element The form is <BASE HREF=URI> and HREF is required The BASE element is placed in the <HEAD> The path information specified by the BASE HREF only affects URIs in the document where the <BASE> element appears All relative URIs are resolved according to a base URI Browsers calculate the base URI according to the following precedences (highest priority to lowest): 1. The base URI is set by the BASE element 2. The base URI is sent by the server in an HTTP header 3. By default, the base URI is that of the current document Copyright 1999-2007 Ellis Horowitz 5 Example - <BASE> Element <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Our Courses</TITLE> <BASE href="http://www.usc.edu/dept/cs/courses"> </HEAD> <BODY> <P>Degree requirements are <A href="../degree/req.html">available here</A>? </BODY> </HTML> The relative URI "../degree/req.html" resolves to http://www.usc.edu/dept/cs/degree/req.html Copyright 1999-2007 Ellis Horowitz 6 Creating Graphics Digital cameras Snap and the image is digitized and can be transferred to a computer Typical resolutions are 1280x1024 and 800x600 Graphic editors Permit the combination of text, drawing, and color For example, Corel PhotoPaint, Adobe Photoshop Scanners Convert text and graphics into machine readable form Copyright 1999-2007 Ellis Horowitz 7 Image Formats Four image formats are always supported by Web browsers x-pixelmaps Similar to x-bitmaps, but 8 bits are given to each pixel, permitting 256 colors in the image G raphic I nterchange F ormat (GIF) Support black and white, grayscale, and color Patented by Unisys (expired)...
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htmlcontinued-4 - Copyright 1999-2007 Ellis Horowitz 1 HTML...

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