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Begin w Baker part 2 - Plant Diversity: Colonization of the...

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Unformatted text preview: Plant Diversity: Colonization of the land Readings: Ch. 29-30 Fig. 29.5 Plant life cycle Fig. 29.13 6th ed. delayed This is an example of heterochrony Heterochrony = a shift in the timing of an event, or a change in the relative rates of components of an event Heterochrony 1. pattern A: X.YZ pattern B: XYZ You should put down your pencil or pen and simply view the next 7 slides while I make one, simple point! I will then restate this point so you can write it down! Fig. 24.15 Amphibian larvae gills See fig. 24.17 Fig. 29.5 Marchantia (a liverwort) Multicellular, dependent embryo Embryo retained long enough to permit connections to be evolved and to evolve a complex sporophyte. Fig. 29.5 Contrast a charophyte (right) with a true plant (above, liverwort) Fig. 29.5 Spores produced in sporangia Three examples of heterochrony Growth of human and chimp skulls from fetus to adult Some amphibians (e.g., axolotl), which breed while they still retain some larval traits (neoteny) Development of more complex sporophyte part of plant life cycle Fig. 29.7 1 st 5-point out-of-class assignment due next Monday at midnight Out-of-class assignment 1 The time is 474.999 million years ago. You are the very first land plant on earth, having just evolved from a charophyte-like ancestor. You are writing a book about your life, and in the first chapter you reflect upon the transition to land that you have made. Due NLT midnight, Monday, March 26, 2007 Cannot be larger than the maximum length I will accept! (Dont know what that length is, do you? So better keep your answer short and sweet.) Challenges to moving onto land 1. Desiccation (drying out) 2. Dispersal / mating (getting sperm and egg together) 3. Uptake/absorption of water and nutrients 4. Support Major groups of plants Bryophytes mosses, liverworts, hornworts...
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This note was uploaded on 04/24/2008 for the course BIOL 102 taught by Professor Baker/robertson during the Fall '08 term at Clark University.

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Begin w Baker part 2 - Plant Diversity: Colonization of the...

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