#15 - Ecotones - 1 Ecotones An ecotone is the area between...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Ecotones An ecotone is the area between two distinct communities. Other names for ecotones include edges, boundaries, and transition zones. An ecotone may be relatively sharp, or it may be broad and blurry Q: do ecotones constitute habitats with their own unique communities? Or are they simply a variable mixture of the species (and physical features?) of the two adjacent communities? Forest/non-forest transition zones Wetland/upland transition Stream/upland transition zone (riparian zone) What happens when the river floods? 2 A typical spring (or wet season) riparian forest along a river A typical river-floodplain system cross-section River/ocean transition; shoreline/ocean transition What about tides? River flooding? Vegetation zonation in a salt marsh 3 Streams naturally increase in size as they move downhill Invertebrate communities change as you proceed downstream from headwaters to large rivers....
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This note was uploaded on 04/24/2008 for the course BIOL 216 taught by Professor Baker during the Spring '08 term at Clark University.

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#15 - Ecotones - 1 Ecotones An ecotone is the area between...

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