philo paper 2

Philo paper 2 - Philo 4 Fall TA Jake Blair Paper#2 Prompt One The eighteenth century philosopher Kant claimed that an action only truly displays

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Philo 4, Fall TA: Jake Blair Paper #2 Prompt One The eighteenth century philosopher, Kant, claimed that an action only, truly displays moral worth when it is a good will preformed from duty. A good will is an act from duty that is set about solely for the sake of morality; it cannot be ignited by any ulterior motives. A good will is the only thing in the world that is unequivocally good, even if its results are not good, its intentions always are; this contrasts to qualities of admirable character and fortune such as wealth, power, intelligence, or courage, which may sometimes be used for negative purposes. Kant stands that a route of action should be chosen through following moral law, “a priori”; irregardless of the consequences, circumstances, or specific past experiences. Reason is the guide for morality, says Kant, not instinct, as some critiques argue. Any living creature is capable of acting from instinct, but only a rational being is able to comprehend a universal moral law, acknowledge that it is an imperative of reason which surpasses all other circumstantial or personal interests, and act out of obeisance for it. Kant created a formula for determining if you are acting within moral law; act in such a way that the maxim, or motivating principle, of the action could become universal law. In other words, you may not act in a way that allows an exception for yourself or others in one particular circumstance that would contradict or fail to apply to all others, at all times.
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Besides acting from duty, Kant describes a different type of act, which he calls acting in accordance with duty. Acting in accordance with duty is acting morally not because you recognize or accept that it is the right thing to do, but because of some other motive or inclination, such as guilt, search for approval, consideration of outcomes, etc.
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This note was uploaded on 04/24/2008 for the course PHIL 4 taught by Professor Chandler during the Fall '08 term at UCSB.

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Philo paper 2 - Philo 4 Fall TA Jake Blair Paper#2 Prompt One The eighteenth century philosopher Kant claimed that an action only truly displays

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