NCLB - Cinciripino, Gugliemo, and Mather 1 No Child Left...

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Cinciripino, Gugliemo, and Mather 1 No Child Left Behind, the Growth of Standardized Testing and the Impact on Students with Disabilities Michelle Cinciripino, Chelsea Gugliemo, and Kayla Mather Dr. Neuville
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Cinciripino, Gugliemo, and Mather 2 Introduction “Standardized testing has swelled and mutated, like a creature in one of those old horror movies, to the point that it now threatens to swallow our schools whole” (Kohn, 2001). That is one opinion from Alfie Kohn of the ever so notorious No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. No Child Left Behind is a major issue with today’s students and their success in the classroom. NCLB is an act to improve the education of students using four “pillars” and a progress tracker. The tracking with NCLB is in the form of standardized tests which have received many contests. Because of the controversial nature of NCLB there are many issues with the way the act works and many different opinions of how it should be revamped. No Child Left Behind The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) was signed into law on January 8, 2002 which reauthorized the Elementary and Second Education Act (ESEA). President Bush’s framework for NCLB was to “improve the performance of America’s elementary and secondary schools while at the same time ensuring that no child is trapped in a failing school”. The four pillars of NCLB are stronger accountability for results, more freedom for states and communities, proven education methods, and more choices for parents. Stronger accountability for results is helping close the gap in education of those students that are disadvantaged. State and school district report card are given every to inform the public about the schools progress in the accountability. Each year the schools that do not make the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) have to provide supplemental services, free torturing, after school programs, corrective action plans, and sometimes make extreme changes in how the school runs. Under NCLB states and communities have more flexibility in how they will use federal education funds. The school
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Cinciripino, Gugliemo, and Mather 3 district can move 50% of its federal funds to any of their teacher quality grants, educational technology, innovative programs, and drug free schools programs. This allows the district to focus more of their money for their specific needs. NCLB also puts emphasis on finding proven educational programs that have gone through thorough scientific research. Those types of programs that are proven are given a lot of federal funds; an example would be the Reading First program. Parents also have more choices if their child’s school is not performing up to standards. Under NCLB, schools that do not perform for at least two years in a row run the risk of parents
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This note was uploaded on 04/24/2008 for the course SPED 212 taught by Professor Dr.neuville during the Spring '08 term at Millersville.

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NCLB - Cinciripino, Gugliemo, and Mather 1 No Child Left...

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