SCAN0199 - o o u o I O a o O 0 Lawyers use adversarial...

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Unformatted text preview: o o u o I O a o O 0 Lawyers use adversarial approach Psychologists use cooperative approach Lawyers are concerned with assigning moral responsibility Psychologists are taught not to moralize or make moral judgments Lawyers are concerned with time and deadlines, speedy trial, etc Psychologists are not as concerned with time, as it may take years to treat a patient Psychologists generally adhere to a theoretical school: behavioral, cognitive, psychoanalytic In law, theory gives way to individual cases and their resolution: law can be viewed as antitheoretical as a court will not try a case simply because it raises an interesting issue Psychologists must recognize that when entering legal arena, they should understand the underlying pragmatic and philosophical approaches between the disciplines Psychologists may be asked “ultimate” questions, which require the psychologist to translate their opinion to legal testimony, such as competency to stand trial or defendant's state of mind This issue is hotly debated (Champagne, 1991, Shuman 1996) Forensic Assessment: Distinctions between Clinical and Forensic Approach Clinical psychologists are taught to evaluate their patient through interviews, psychological testing and additional information from family members, friends, hospital records and records from previous therapists Clinical psychologists are taught to listen to patients concerns, and accept gatient’s symptoms as valid >9$96Wcj13 my Lying, deceit, exaggeration and malingering do occur, but are secondary matters ire, mealrg Forensic psychologists can not automatically accept a litigants description of what happened. gerrcm. 0t: I YEW—Q Litigant has an obvious motive to lie, exaggerate, or distort symptoms and events Pan‘s, 38“ Litigant maybe seeking to create a psychological defense, recover money or damages, or to transfer from a jail to a hospital Traditional clinical approach can not be used in forensic assessments Criminal’s version of events, background and symptom description must be corroborated (Davidson, 1965, Melton et al, 1997) by the forensic psychologist Psychological Testing: Traditional and Specialized Forensic Tests Testing assists in reducing subjectivity of clinical evaluation Due to its objectivity, psychological testing is used a lot in forensic assessments Traditionally used psychological tests: 0 o o I Personality inventories "g e‘w‘lw‘fi- men-fa] Capaci- Projective Personality Tests do Comm; 1— "the. s Tests of General Educational Functioning m me“ Tests of Memory Functioning Tests for Neuropsychological Impairment Test for Specific Disorders Projective Tests These tests are designed to have individuals respond to a visual stimulus, and when asked to respond to it, the individuals response will reveal aspects of his or her personality - Thematic A pegs tionlest (TAT) subject is shown a number of pictures and subject is asked to create a story, and it is assumed the subject will reveal wishes, thoughts, conflicts, motives and feelings Projective Figure Drawings - person is asked to draw a house, a tree, a person, person of opposite sex, worst thing they can think of, or similar topics and interpretation is made from them Bender-Gestalt test asks subject to copy nine geometric figures, and interpretation is done by psychologist from way drawing is done Personality Inventories Highly Types standardized and have considerable empirical validation include: Minnesota Multiphasic Personality inventory (MMPI) California Psychological Inventory (CPI) Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI) Intellectual and Cognitive Assessment Intellectual and cognitive assessment is critical in any forensic assessment Examples of tests include: Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Halsted-Reitan W “Wt“ ...
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