401 Albert Bandura Paper

401 Albert Bandura Paper - Albert Bandura Running Head:...

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Albert Bandura 1 Running Head: Albert Bandura The Influence of Albert Bandura on Educational Psychology Mark Mazurik Washington State University
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Albert Bandura 2 Albert Bandura was a pioneer when it came to his social learning, personality, and modeling theories and therapies; his influences started a revolution in the examination of how people imitate certain actions and self-regulate based on mere perception. He was described by one of his former students as a “jovial genius” for his wisdom, humility, and wonderful sense of humor (Zimmerman, 2002). Albert Bandura is considered by many to be the third most influential psychologist ever, behind B.F. Skinner and Sigmund Freud respectively (About.com). The last of six children, he was born on December 24, 1925 in the miniscule town of Mundare in Alberta, Canada, about 50 miles east of Edmonton. His parents were Polish wheat farmers (Moore, 1999). He attended a small kindergarten through 12 th grade school with only twenty students and two teachers (About.com); it was very small and didn’t have a lot, but overall it was a great institution with a fantastic success rate. "The students had to take charge of their own education…Very often we developed a better grasp of the subjects than the overworked teachers" (Stokes, 1986a, p. 2). 60% of Bandura’s class went on to receive degrees at different universities across the nation. That was unheard of for a tiny community like the one they belonged to. After high school, not yet knowing what to do, he worked in the Yukon on the Alaska Highway as a hole-filler to earn money for college tuition. After that experience, he then decided to go to college and received his bachelor’s degree in just three years with the Bolocan Award in Psychology from the University of British Columbia in 1949. At first, he did not even think about majoring in psychology. But after taking a psychology class to fill an empty time slot, he became so fascinated and could not resist (Zimmerman, 2002).
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Albert Bandura 3 Bandura realized that school was important, so he kept at it. He was quoted as saying, "the content of most textbooks is perishable, but the tools of self-directedness serve one well over time" (Stokes, 1986a, p. 2). So, after getting his B.A., he decided to go after the Ph. D. He received his Ph. D. in clinical Psychology in 1952 from the University of Iowa and studied under Kenneth Spence and Kurt Lewin. Students at Iowa followed the study of students at Yale due to the friendship of Spence and Clark Hull (Zimmerman, 2002). Bandura did not follow the Hullian theory though, because he liked the idea of trial and error learning. While there, he became very interested in Behaviorism and the learning theory. While getting his degree at Iowa, he met his wife, Virginia Varns, a teacher in the Nursing school, while golfing with a friend one day; they were taking a break from the tedious graduate work. Soon after, they married and had two daughters. After graduating from Iowa, he did an internship at the Wichita Guidance
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401 Albert Bandura Paper - Albert Bandura Running Head:...

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