Socratess - Emily Thurmaier Philosophy 230 I question...

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Emily Thurmaier Philosophy 230 I question whether it is moral for me to judge the morality of another man’s decision to keep his life. However, the reasoning behind his decision is something that is far more interesting to me anyway. Even with his friend, Crito, pushing him to escape and stay among the living, Socrates refuses and accepts his imminent death. From the start of Crito , Socrates seems grounded in his decision to die, and states the simplest reasoning. “Well, really, Crito, it would strike an odd chord for a man of my age to resent having to face death.” (pg.80) That, alone, is a pretty good statement. I’ve watched that sort of attitude come and go within members of my family and church congregation. It’s a statement of peace with death and bravery, or at least not fear, of it. Crito, on the other hand, seems to have a definite fear of something. His greatest argument is that his reputation will be blown to bits upon the ‘murder’ of Socrates. To me, this is a representation of the fear of death. Crito seems to be the complete opposite
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This note was uploaded on 04/25/2008 for the course PHIL 230 taught by Professor Holmgren during the Spring '07 term at Iowa State.

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Socratess - Emily Thurmaier Philosophy 230 I question...

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