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Chapter1 - BIO-1033 Drugs and Society Chapter-1 Janakiram...

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BIO-1033 Drugs and Society Chapter-1  Janakiram Seshu, Ph.D Assistant Professor Department of Biology UTSA Office: BSE 3.230C Phone: 458-6578 Email: [email protected]  
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History of psychoactive drugs Historically people have chosen to alter their  perception of reality with substances: To alter states of consciousness  To reduce pain Forget harsh surroundings Alter a mood Explore feelings Promote social interaction Escape boredom Treat a mental illness Stimulate creativity Enhance the senses
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Five Historical Themes of Drug Use Human  beings  have  basic  need  to  cope  with  their environment and existence Human brain chemistry  affected by psychoactive drugs  induce an altered state of consciousness or mood Governments and businesses have been involved in cultivating, manufacturing, distributing, taxing and prohibiting drugs. Technological advances  refining and synthesizing drugs  increased the potency of these substances Efficient  and  faster  methods  of  drug  delivery  to  intensify  the effects
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II. PREHISTORY & THE NEOLITHIC  PERIOD (8500–4000 B.C.) Prehistoric life-dangerous and mysterious environment Inflict pain or death rapidly: Brutal weather Predatory animals Aggressive enemy tribes Abusive relatives Life-threatening diseases (mostly infectious diseases) They constantly search for ways to control these dangers Draw cave pictures Build more complex societies (cities) Worship gods Fasted, danced, chanted, self-hypnosis, self-inflicted pain, meditated, performed rituals and ceremonies
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II. PREHISTORY & THE NEOLITHIC PERIOD (8500–4000 B.C.) Early man lived in a dangerous and mysterious environment that  could inflict pain or death rapidly: Brutal weather Predatory animals Aggressive enemy tribes Abusive relatives Life-threatening diseases (mostly infectious diseases) They constantly search for ways to control these dangers Draw cave pictures Build more complex societies (cities) Worship gods Fasted, danced, chanted, self-hypnosis, self-inflicted pain,  meditated, performed rituals and ceremonies
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II.   PREHISTORY & THE NEOLITHIC PERIOD  (8500–4000 B.C.) (cont’d) By chance or by experimentation Ingesting certain plants  fear and anxiety, reduce pain, treat some illnesses, give pleasure and let them “talk to  gods” Use of medicinal and psychedelic plants 50,000 years ago Used mostly in shamanic religions: the shaman is a combination of priest/doctor  and a key figure in these religions to contact spirits and gods Use of drugs spread though tribal migrations. Brought to America about 10,000- 15,000 years ago  
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