huber ch5&6 - Information Systems: Creating...

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Information Systems: Creating Business Value by Mark Huber, Craig Piercy, and Patrick McKeown Chapter 5: IT for Organizations
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Computer Hierarchy Computer Type Relative Processing Power Purpose Supercomputer Largest and Fastest Processor intensive applications Mainframe Large Organizational processing Server Farms Medium/many Handle network processing needs Personal Computer (PC) Small to medium Individual processing needs Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) Very small Portable computing power Embedded processors Extremely small Low-scale processing and/or identification
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Types of Organizational Networks Network Size Purpose PAN (Private Area Network--private) Up to a small office Communication between devices LAN (Local Area Network--private) Within a building Sharing between users in an organization MAN (Metropolitan Area Network— private/public) Within a metropolitan area High speed data and voice communications WAN (Wide Area Network— private/public) Over a large geo- graphical area) Sharing among organizational units distant from one another Internet (Public) Global Sharing with all stakeholders in organization; also general public
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Intranets in the Organization Intranets are very important to the organization. An intranet is a set of services for distributing private information throughout the organization. From a hardware perspective, an intranet is a collection of private networks. Intranets use the TCP/IP protocol to share information, just like the Internet. They use Internet-compatible file formats like HTML and XML to share information.
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Individual vs. Organizational Software Type of Software Individual Use Organizational Use Operating Systems To manage a single computer To manage a mainframe or server farm Application Software Personal productivity software Transaction processing, data storage, and organizational productivity software Collaboration Software Supports communication between individuals Enables members of organization to share work Software at the organizational level is like that at personal level, just more complex and able to handle more transactions.
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Databases: Primary Data Storage for Organizations All business information systems rely on stored data to make decisions. The primary technology for data storage is the database. A database consists of interrelated that are stored in files for easy access of specific pieces of data. A database management system (DBMS) is a collection of software that allows users to create and work with a database.
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DBMSs Control Database Access
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Database Systems A database and its DBMS is often referred to as a database system. People who create and manage
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This note was uploaded on 04/23/2008 for the course DSS 1011 taught by Professor Mendoza during the Spring '08 term at Saint Joseph's University.

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huber ch5&6 - Information Systems: Creating...

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