BA_242_Chapter_Seven_-_Post-1 - BA 242 Business Ethics...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
BA 242 – Business Ethics Chapter Seven: The Ethics of Job Discrimination
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Introduction Discrimination based on gender and race have been around for so long in business, its consequences have been substantial and persistent. We will examine the nature of discrimination, discuss the ethical aspects of such behavior, and conclude by considering affirmative action programs.
Background image of page 2
Job Discrimination: Its Nature Though more women and minorities are entering formerly white-male dominated jobs, they still face discrimination. Studies show that women and minorities are systematically given less consideration in hiring, fewer job offers, and less desirable jobs than white males. Other research shows that blacks and Hispanics were offered jobs 50% fewer times than white males.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Discrimination Discrimination in its root meaning is not all wrong: distinguishing one object from another. Our use is that of wrongful discrimination on the basis of prejudice rather than merit. Discrimination: The wrongful act of distinguishing illicitly among people not on the basis of individual merit, but on the basis of prejudice or some other invidious or morally reprehensible attitude. Invidious: 1 : tending to cause discontent, animosity, or envy 2 : envious 3 a : of an unpleasant or objectionable nature : obnoxious < invidious remarks> b : of a kind to cause harm or resentment <an invidious comparison> Merriam-Webster. Reprehensible: deserving of reproof, rebuke, or censure; blameworthy. Dictionary.com
Background image of page 4
Discrimination
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Discrimination
Background image of page 6
Discriminatory Acts Discriminatory acts can be categorized according to the extent to which they are intentional and institutionalized. An act may be part of the isolated behavior of a single individual who intentionally discriminates based on personal prejudice An act may be part of the systematic routine of a group that unintentionally discriminates because group members uncritically incorporate the discriminatory practices of society. In the early 1960’s, discrimination was generally seen as intentional and individual. By the 70’s, a shift emphasized the unintentional forms of discrimination. A group would be guilty of discrimination of minority group representation were not proportionate to the minority group’s local availability. This is still a hot-button issue, and is often debated today.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Job Discrimination: Its Extent An indication of discrimination exists when a disproportionate number of a certain group’s members hold less desirable positions despite their preferences and abilities. Comparisons of average benefits given to various groups Comparisons of the proportion of a group found in the lowest levels of the institution Comparisons of the proportion of a group found in the most advantageous positions of the institution Shows that discrimination is still quite present in the U.S. today.
Background image of page 8
Black and White? The mean annual income for black households is
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/24/2008 for the course B A 242 taught by Professor Mr.scheib during the Fall '08 term at Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

Page1 / 27

BA_242_Chapter_Seven_-_Post-1 - BA 242 Business Ethics...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online