SFT 235-Paper on Disaster Preparedness

SFT 235-Paper on Disaster Preparedness - Sarah E Dennison...

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Sarah E. Dennison SFT 235-203 James Mcintosh 4/13/2008 Asian Disaster, Preparedness, and Safety Program We all know about the tsunami that devastated the continent of Asia as well as the Pacific Islands on December 26, 2004. The Bangkok Post printed an article on May 4, 2005 entitled "Tsunami response was no disaster". The article talked about and previewed a conference that was held to discuss the health aspects of the tsunami disaster. The article read that "Thailand and other Asian countries affected by the disaster needed to set aside their image-building and concentrate on the lessons learned from the catastrophe to boost cooperation and be better prepared for future disasters". (Bangkok Post 2005) Furthermore, the meetings purpose was discuss among delegates "the level of seriousness and concern that regional governments may have had towards the improvement of response for killer waves such as the December 26th 2005 scenario".(Bangkok Post 2005) The Thai government wanted to use the forum to review what had been done in terms of a health response and to push the framework of cooperation among all concerned. It continued to state that "unlike in other countries hit by the
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tsunami, Thailand's health-care system won praise for its swift response to the devastation in the six provinces affected along the Andaman coast. The initial problems of trauma and disease are now under control, thanks to a well-developed health infrastructure and good basic care, especially in Krabi, Phangnga, and Phuket, which boasted several well-equipped medical centers." In continuum, according to a report in the British medical journal "the greatness of the response contributed to a low mortality rate of just 0.3% among the more than 8,000 patients seeking hospital care. There also had been no sign of a major outbreak or killer pathogens in local communities, the most common ailments having been non- cholera diarrhea and infected injuries".(Bangkok Post 2005) Apichai Mongkol, a director-general of the mental health department said "it was impossible to help the survivors in the short term to get through their mental trauma. The department had rotated teams of psychiatrists in tsunami-affected communities so that they served for up to two months at a time and most took at least six months to recover". (Bangkok Post 2005) Identifying the bodies was one of the biggest tasks at hand post- disaster. The Thai Tsunami Victims Identification Centre was in charge of this overwhelming responsibility. Their duties included identification, returning the bodies of foreigners to their home countries, and website implementation and maintenance. The website is quite an amazing thing to behold. The detailed
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information, pictures, and the way it provided a liaison as well as a general forum for those that were affected and looking for their loved ones is unlike anything I have ever seen on the Internet. The internet address for the site is www.missingpersons.or.th and is easily translated into English with just one push
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SFT 235-Paper on Disaster Preparedness - Sarah E Dennison...

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