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ch11_metters - Six Sigma Chapter 11 Why do managers have a...

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Six Sigma Chapter 11
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Chapter 11 – Six Sigma Successful Service Operations Management, 2006, Thomson 2 Why do managers have a hard time spotting quality problems? Processes evolve over time Assumptions become embedded in processes and managers do not think to question the assumptions Every person suffers from a set of mental “biases” – making it hard to process new information
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Chapter 11 – Six Sigma Successful Service Operations Management, 2006, Thomson 3 Mental Biases
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Chapter 11 – Six Sigma Successful Service Operations Management, 2006, Thomson 4 Two Different “Time to Answer” Scenarios Most performance measures are reported as averages and ignore variation e.g., average time on hold, average utilization, etc. Two Different “Time to Answer” Scenarios:
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Chapter 11 – Six Sigma Successful Service Operations Management, 2006, Thomson 5 Deviations from Time to Answer
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Chapter 11 – Six Sigma Successful Service Operations Management, 2006, Thomson 6 Motivation for Six Sigma Managers need a structured way to think about their business that Pinpoints the impact of variation Allows them to bring assumptions to the surface so that they can be evaluated, and Forces them to step beyond the mental biases every person faces The quality movement addresses these needs Six sigma is the latest approach with a focus on reducing variation
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Chapter 11 – Six Sigma Successful Service Operations Management, 2006, Thomson 7 Variation Nearly every phenomenon has An average value that can be thought of as describing a “central tendency” and Variation that describes some “dispersion around the mean” The “standard deviation,” identified by the Greek character sigma (σ), is the most common and useful of the measures of variation ( 29 2 1 1 n i i x X n σ = - = -
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Chapter 11 – Six Sigma Successful Service Operations Management, 2006, Thomson 8 The Normal Distribution The normal distribution is determined by two
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This note was uploaded on 04/24/2008 for the course SYST 3030 taught by Professor Macaluso,g during the Spring '08 term at Colorado.

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ch11_metters - Six Sigma Chapter 11 Why do managers have a...

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