SOC 220 Greetings and Intro

SOC 220 Greetings and Intro - b) Society helps keep people...

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Professor Hillis Bachelor's in Finance, Masters in Economics, Doctorate in Sociology From Indiana 50 years old, used to be into basketball, blew out shoulder Reptile fanatic Plays chess Horrible w/ answering email; use any method other than that, or email the TAs Personal beliefs: skeptic, including of sociology, almost militant libertarian Course Going to have 3 in-class exams, 200 pts apiece, open-note, open-book, open-everything except electronic devices or your neighbor; fast-paced exams (true false?) Attendance policy: 100 pts, -5 for every absence beyond 3 Syllabus will be provided by Friday w/ information determined in class today Should we view persistan patterns of human suffering (or other problems) as "social problems" (i.e. arising out of social causes or conditions)? i. A big part of resisting suicide is social integration a) Humans, left to themselves, are hedonistic and ultimately self-destructive
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Unformatted text preview: b) Society helps keep people in line, make people feel satisfied and needed c) E. Durkheim - suicide - we will be looking at anomie ("normlessness") 1) C. Wright Mills - the sociological imagination 2) L. Von Mises - Human Action 3) Or should we view such problems as purely individual problems (however prevalent) ii. For example: is alchoholism on campus due to the structure, values, etc. of college? Or are they purely individual? iii. Historical background: the ideological debate between Collectivism and Individualism A) Social problem: a condition that undermines the well-being of some or all members of a society and that is usually a matter of public controversy B) The subjective-objective debate C) What is a social problem? I) Introduction Monday, January 07, 2008 1:31 PM Class Notes Page 1...
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This note was uploaded on 04/25/2008 for the course SOC 220 taught by Professor Hillis during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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