SOC 402 Structural Functionalism

SOC 402 Structural Functionalism - society a. Marx or Weber...

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Social Structures - persiting patterns of relationship and interaction; institutions; subsystems a. Social Functions - Consequences of relationships among social structures for the survival of a society b. Structural Functionalism - Explains the existence of, and relationship among, social structures based on their social functions c. What is Structural functionalism? 1) A stratification system is a hierarchal system of occupational positions (not persons) of unequal statuses and rewards. a. b. Fill certain needed positions of society i. Perform the duties of those positions ii. This is because, in every society, individuals must somehow be motivated to… c. K Davis and W Moore - A functionalist theory of inequality 2) The thing that shows this to be functionalist is use of the word "must" - indicates that this is viewed as a functional necessity of
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Unformatted text preview: society a. Marx or Weber would have no disagreement w/ this term removed b. The Davis-Moore Hypothesis: "Social inequaliy is thus an unconsiously evolved device by which societies insure that the most important positions are conscientiously filled by the most qualified persons. Hence every society, no matter how simple or complex, must differentiate persons in terms of both prestige and esteem, and must therefore possess a certain amount of institutionalized inequality" (Davis and Moore, p. 243) 3) Davis and Moore: what determines job rewards? Job rewards = job importance + skill scarcity + job unpleasantness 4) 5) Lecture 6A - Structural Functionalism - Is Social Stratification a Functional Requisite? Monday, September 24, 2007 9:41 AM Class Notes Page 1...
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