LIFE SCIENCE MODULE I April 18 2016 - LIFE SCIENCE MODULES...

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LIFE SCIENCE MODULES King L. Chow, LIFS
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Three key objectives Biology is simple, not about memorization Accept that you are part of the biological world with its own distinct characters Appreciate the beauty of the nature in the broadest sense
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Key Learning Outcomes Recognizing some key biology concepts Through historical examples, recognize how great ideas sprouted from nothing but observations Explore systematically and scientifically through inquiry on novel issues Let your own curiosity drive you forward Recognize how technology drives more understanding Reflect on your personal view of the world and most importantly yourself Creativity sprouts from the acceptance of unexpected
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What is life? ? ….100101001001001…..
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The Process of Science (biology) Biology (Bio-logie) is the scientific study of life. Living thing = Life?? Biologists—and all scientists—generally test hypotheses using the scientific methods. 1. Logical reasoning 2. Experimental Verification
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Week 1 How is life described? Technology advancement drives the details of description. Describing life with its primitive codes. Week 2 Mechanisms behind the codes. How should the codes be read (How were they cracked?) Conservation of the code in living creatures–our common root. Week 3 Tools to replicate the code. Designing with the code. Creating lives by designing new codes. Our revelation
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“Seeing” is believing What do you see? How much detail do you want to see? How much detail can you see? You see what you want to see! You see nothing, if you are not curious to explore!
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A curiosity driven process We look from the surface…..we look from within If we can’t, we tear them apart and check it out. What are we most curious about? Ourselves! How we are related to the outside world? What do we want to see? How can we see it? For what purpose? Self-positioning!
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Egyptian time 1500 BC, EberPapyrus , an ancient Egyptian record with a collection of 800 prescriptions for various kinds of diseases, eye infection, child birth, skin diseases, etc, using milk, dung, honey, garlic and aloe verafrom plant, animal and mineral sources. In it, there is the description of the heart and vessels connected to different organs…. Description!
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A Maya bust A historical record of human dissection 250-900 AD Understanding ourselves
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Easter Island in South Pacific, 700 -1100 CE
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Greek time (500-350 BC Hippocrates described the musculoskeletal structure and defined organs) I swear by Apollo , the healer, Asclepius , Hygieia , and Panacea , and I take to witness all the gods, all the goddesses, to keep according to my ability and my judgment, the following Oath and agreement: To consider dear to me, as my parents, him who taught me this art ; to live in common with him and, if necessary, to share my goods with him; To look upon his children as my own brothers, to teach them this art; and that by my teaching, I will impart a knowledge of this art to my own sons, and to my
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