gatsby paper final - Megan Cho and Mallory DeLise Polly Reid English 1102 24 September 2013 Great Gatsby Dialogue In F Scott Fitzgeralds novel and Baz

gatsby paper final - Megan Cho and Mallory DeLise Polly...

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Megan Cho and Mallory DeLisePolly ReidEnglish 110224 September 2013Great Gatsby DialogueIn F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel and Baz Luhrmann’s motion picture, The Great Gatsby,each character is carefully portrayed from particular points of view, varying from situation to situation. Among these characters is Nick Carraway who plays the role of the conflicted narrator. Without his presence, the story could not play out, making his role crucial to the development of the plot.Luhrmann begins his film with a scene of Carraway visibly distressed in a psychiatric ward as he tells the story of Gatsby to the therapist. It is suggested by the psychiatrist that Carraway writes down his experiences he had with Gatsby, which is ultimately the frame for the majority of the movie. Contrastingly, Nick Carraway was never in a psychiatric hospital in the novel, but instead narrates from a first person point of view through the duration of the events. In both accounts of the story, Nick Carraway’s role is left open for interpretation by the audience because his character is portrayed as both “within and without”, an instigator and a bystander, throughout the events of the story.Megan Cho:Mallory, based on the information you have taken in regarding Nick Carraway in both the film and the novel, do you believe he is portrayed as an instigator or a bystander?Mallory DeLise:Nick Carraway is portrayed as an instigator throughout the entire story. It was made very clear that his character attended Yale University prior to the story, implying he is a fully competent and well-rounded individual. He takes great pride in his intelligence and his “high standards”, to a point of almost arrogance. He even states about himself: “I am one of the few honest people that I have ever known” (Fitzgerald 69). If Nick Carraway is really as intelligent as Fitzgerald or Luhrmann want everyone to believe, then he was fully aware of the activities he was indulging in. He is not merely bystanding, but he is rather performing every action with intent. Carraway earns the trust of the other characters in the story and the trust of the audience, and this is why he becomes so involved in every situation. Everything he participates in instigates dishonest behaviors of other characters. Thisallows for the entire plotline of the story. Megan Cho:I can see where you are coming from, Mallory. Nick Carraway is indeed a well-rounded and competent person. He even says himself that he wishes to be “the ‘well-rounded’ man” (Fitzgerald 9). He may appear to be egotistical in a way, butthis is the result of his midwestern upbringing and honest teachings of his father. Fitzgerald portrays him in this way in order to get across the message that he is intelligent enough to keep his lips sealed and keep away from the he-said-she-said
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babble. You say that his intelligence should have made him well aware of his actions, yet the same can apply to the other characters that are performing the dishonest behaviors. Nick cannot be the one to blame for instigating them because they too are
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