Chapter+7-The+Gendered+Classroom Study Guide - Chapter 7...

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Chapter 7: The Gendered ClassroomThis week you will read Chapter 7 in the text (pp. 189-220), which looks at the role gender plays in educational settings. You will also read “Spice Girls, Nice Girls” by Reay, which can be found in the reader starting on page 249. While reading the chapter, please focus on the learning objectives listed below. Below you will also find study guide questions for the assigned articles (you are not required to answer these, but some find it helpful to use these questions to make sure they understand the main ideas of the reading). Learning objectives:1. To be able to name ways in which children perform and are treated differently in the classroom. (pg. 191-196)-Nursery schools & kindergarten classes often have heavy blocks, trucks, airplanes, and carpentry tools in one area & dolls and homemaking equipment in another-officially “open” to anyone for play, but these areas are often sex-segregated by invisible but real boundaries-Kimmel’s nursery school where he taught in the late 1970s:-girls come in quietly, place coats neatly in lockers, walk slowly & uncertainly into the inside room where they’d look for a friend and sit quietly looking at books, talking, or playing in sandbox while they adjust to the new day at school-boys race in, throw coats into lockers (missing half the time), dash outside, grab a truck, run to the yard, shouting all the way-Boys and girls learn & teach each other what are the appropriate behaviors and experiences for boys and girls and make sure that everyone acts according to plan-classroom setting reproduces gender inequality- “From elementary through higher education, female students receive less active instruction, both in the quantity and quality of teacher time and attention.” –Myra & David Sadker; Failing at Fairness-Many teachers perceive boys as being active, capable of expressing anger, quarrelsome, punitive, alibi-building, and exhibitionistic -they perceive girls as being affectionate, obedient, responsive, and tenacious -when boys “put girls down” teachers (female usually) often say and do nothing to correct them encouraging the boys’ notion of superiority-Many teachers assume girls are likely to “love” reading and “hate” maths and sciences & expect the opposite from boys-Teachers call on boys more often and spend more time with them-they ask boys more challenging questions & wait longer for boys to answer-they urge boys to try harder, constantly telling them they can “do it”-part of the reason for this is boys demand more attention & part of it is that teachers treat boys & girls differently -Teachers say, “boys need it more” and “boys have trouble reading, writing, doing math. They can’t even sit still”-Egalia School in Stockholm, Sweden (pg. 195-196): belief in equality; everything is organized to eliminate gender bias2. To understand how media influences play a role in gendered education. (pg. 196-198)-Boys know they can make mistakes b/c they will continue to be centrally reflected in course content

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