Chapter+6-Study Guide - Chapter 6 The Gendered Family This...

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Chapter 6: The Gendered FamilyThis week you will learn about gender in the social institution of the family. In this module you will also find a lecture (with audio) to supplement the required reading (Chapter 6 in the text, pp. 143-188), which will be available in the middle of the week. This week you will also read “American Marriage in the Early 21stCentury” by Cherlin, which can be found in the reader starting on page 183. While reading the chapter, please focus on the learning objectives listed below. Below you will also find study guide questions for the assigned article (youare not required to answer these, but some find it helpful to use these questions to make sure they understand the main ideas of the reading). Learning objectives:1. To understand the historical trajectory of the American family from the eighteenth century to the twenty-first, in particular how the 1950s fit into this history. (pgs. 144-154)-18thcentury: paternal authority was still core of well-ordered family but in a ‘surge of sentiment,’ men & women were encouraged to marry on the basis of mutual affection; marriage was regarded as “union of individuals” rather than “union of two lineages” -decline in husbands beating wives -parents less harsh towards children-American women had greater freedom that European women-no dowries that tied them economically to family, right to own property in their own names after marriage-19thCentury: pundits warned that men were so dedicated to their work they were becoming absentee landlords at home-fretted that if women entered workplace or got the vote, the family would collapse-Much of family values debate is a displaces quarrel w/ feminism (often wrongly blamed/credited w/ what may be the single greatest transformation of American society in the 20thcentury-the entry of women into workplace)-Modern family was built upon a wide foundation of economic and political supports-todays sustained by infrastructure that includes public funding for roads, schools, & home buying and the legal arrangements of marriageand divorce-18th& 19thCentury American family looked less like monarchy & more like a “little commonwealth” in which husbands, wives, and children worked together as participants in common enterprise-Dawn of 19th: child-rearing manuals written to fathers, not mothers, and children were largely raised by their same-sex parent in an informal but common sex-segregated pattern -Mid 19th: gap b/w work and home grew dramatically, both in reality and in ideology, to create the separation of spheresMen experienced separation in two ways:1.)paid work shifted from home and farm to mill and factory, shop and office2.)men’s share of work around home was gradually industrialized & eliminated as such tasks as fuel gathering, leather working, and grain processing shifted to the external world-men were “liberated” and left rearing of children to women-divorce rate climbed from 7000 (in 1860) to 56,000 (in 1900) and 100,000 (in 1914)-20th

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