Chapter+9-Gender+and+Work Study Guide - Learning objectives...

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Learning objectives:1. To understand the ways in which the labor force and the wage gap have changed and the ways they have remained the same in the past 100–150 years. (pg. 246-249 & pg. 261-266)-perhaps the most significant change in the relationship of gender & work is numerical-the enormous shift in the gender composition of the labor force-% of both women and men entering increased throughout last century, but women’s rate far outpaces men’s-women’s entry into labor force has taken place at every level, from low-paid clerical and sales work through all major professions-since early 19thcentury workplace has been seen as a masculine arena, where men could test and prove their manhood against other men in the dog-eat-dog marketplace-Wage gap has been astonishingly consistent-In biblical times female workers valued at 60% of male workers’ value; this wage difference has remained relatively constant for the past 150 years Since Civil War women’s wages have fluctuated b/w ½ and 2/3rds of men’s wages-wage gap varies w/ levels of education-college-educated women make 29% less than educated men and around the same as noncollege-educated men-women enter labor force at more comparable starting salaries, but as they continue their careers, gender discrimination in promotion and raises adds to the differences in income-men enter labor force for good, women occasionally take time out for childbearing and parental leave; has calamitous effect on women’s wages and fuels the growing gap across the life span2. To understand the place of the United States in workplace gender discrimination. (pg. 253-254 &-For many years the chief obstacle facing women who sought to enter the labor force was sex discrimination-gender discrimination; employers refer to a variety of characteristics about women in order to exclude them (they don’t really want to work, they don’t need the money, they have diff. aptitudes and interests)-discrimination on basis of gender is permissible, but only under the most exceptional of circumstances; must be based on some occupational requirement that either only men or only women could meet (very difficult to demonstrate in court)-men with ‘traditional’ gender role attitudes (believing women’s place was at home) translated into a $8549 increase over men with more egalitarian values3. To be able to name both overt and subtle forms of sexism in the workplace. (pg. 250-253)-traditional idea of why women worked was because they had to:-because they were single, working class, and/or the sole economic support for their children, or because they wanted spending money-women faced persistent discrimination based on their gender:-paid less, promoted less, & assigned to specific jobs despite their qualifications & motivations; & they’re made to feel unwelcome, like intruders in an all-male preserve-men say they’re bewildered and angered by the changes in the workplace that make them feel like they’re walking on eggshells Forms of Subtle Sexism:-Condescending chivalry:

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