00 Horror Curriculum Map - Horror Literature Curriculum Map Description and Purpose of the Course Students will read classic and contemporary short

00 Horror Curriculum Map - Horror Literature Curriculum Map...

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Horror Literature Curriculum Map Description and Purpose of the Course: Students will read classic and contemporary short stories and novels, with an emphasis on the supernatural, psychological, and allegorical themes and tropes in horror fiction. Special attention will be given to relevant social and historical background information. The course will center on written fiction, with occasional reference to and exploration of horror in films and other media. Additionally, we will occasionally explore how to craft horror and build suspense, just like the “gurus” we are reading. Major Learning Goals & Understandings Goal 1: Making the focus of inquiry the stories, writers, cultures, and history of horror. Goal 2: Understanding how and why we utilize fear. Goal 3: Deconstructing a text to understand how an author crafts suspense and tension. Goal 4: Exploring and working through feelings of fear. Goal 5: Creating something original. Units & Approximate # of Weeks/Unit Unit 1 - An Intro to the Craft and Psychology of Horror (3-4 weeks) Unit 2 - Vampires, Werewolves, and Zombies, Oh My! (4-5 weeks) Unit 3 - Ghost Stories & Adaptations (4-5 weeks) Unit 3 - Monsters of the Mind (4-5 weeks)
Unit 1 - An Introduction to the Craft and Psychology of Horror Common Core Standards Reading Standards for ELA, 11-12 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3 Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.5 Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact. Writing Standards for ELA, 11-12 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.1.A Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.1.B Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

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