e coli paper

E coli paper - Horn 1 Kate Horn Pamela Brady FDSC 2503 27 November 2007 Escherichia coli and Raw Milk Humans have always been connected to the

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Horn 1 Kate Horn Pamela Brady FDSC 2503 27 November 2007 Escherichia coli and Raw Milk Humans have always been connected to the earth, and the food it produces. While extremely important for survival in the past, modern food collection has and will play a vital role in the survival of man in the years to come. Not only is maintaining the environment a major battle that humanity must fight, but also being able to produce enough food to sustain the ever-growing population that the planet nurtures. One obstacle to food production that is becoming ever more common is the establishment of foodborne illness and regulations to help prevent it. One common strain Escherichia coli, better known as E. coli, has put fear in the hearts of the growing public. While eating out is on the rise throughout America, so is foodborne illness. One item that many do not associate with E. coli is raw milk. Even though, most milk is pasteurized today, raw milk is still available to be purchased, and affected many who lived in the past. Beginning in the early 20
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This note was uploaded on 04/26/2008 for the course FDSC 2503 taught by Professor Brady during the Fall '07 term at Arkansas.

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E coli paper - Horn 1 Kate Horn Pamela Brady FDSC 2503 27 November 2007 Escherichia coli and Raw Milk Humans have always been connected to the

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