Humanistic Psychology - Philosophical Foundations

Humanistic Psychology - Philosophical Foundations - Psych....

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Psych. 2000 -- Humanistic Psychology Carl Rogers On Becoming a Person -- (Read Chapters 1,2,3,5,7) GENERAL IDEAS & THEMES Carl Rogers Most famous for: Client - Centered Therapy (a.k.a., Person Centered Therapy) Psychotherapy that stresses the therapist’s [T] offering the client [C]… UNCONDITIONAL POSITIVE REGARD -- an accepting, empathetic and honest reflection of the client’s feelings and experience. without judging, advising, admonishing, ordering, directing, etc. as a way of helping the client get in touch with his/her actual feelings & experience so that he/she can become more real, less distorted to self and others, and ultimately becoming himself/herself (i.e., the person he/she is truly capable of becoming) hence an emphasis on becoming, rather than “curing,” “treating,” etc. a PROCESS orientation (rather than stressing end-states) values change over fixity. therapy resides more in the relationship between T & C rather than in technique (being a particular way rather than doing a particular thing). hence need for T’s ongoing becoming. Stresses the value of hearing another person deeply, and letting him/her know it. Chapter 1: “This is Me” In part, a brief autobiography, but also some basic points of theory. Why the emphasis on the biographical details?
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As a holistic endeavor, humanistic psychology sees the person of the researcher or therapist as integral to the theories he/she holds. Rogers is attempting to own his perspective on therapy as a personal affair intimately connected to the path of his life (which I tried also to do in my “9 rules of thumb” essay: www.westga.edu/~psydept/dodson/9rules.html) Rogers lists a number of SIGNIFICANT LEARNINGS #1: “In my relationships with persons I have found that it does not help, in the long run, to act as though I were something that I am not.” (p.16) easy to be fake, phony (with others, also with ourselves) can get us through easily mostly about being defensive trying to protect ourselves - from others - from ourselves - our own harsh judgments. does tend to work in the short run but NOT the long run. #2. “I find I am more effective when I can listen acceptantly to myself, and can be myself.” (p.17) being honest with oneself being who one actually is. But what about CHANGING, GROWING, ASPIRATIONS, etc.? Rogers a PARADOX here “. . . when I accept myself as I am, then I change . . . We cannot move away from what we are, until we thoroughly accept what we are”
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That’s when “relationships become real” “real relationships tend to change rather thatn to remain static.” (p.18) #3. “I have found it of enormous value when I can permit myself to understand another person.” (p.18) I can permit myself this is difficult we don’t usually understand one another usually we judge one another. Genuine understanding is RARE
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Humanistic Psychology - Philosophical Foundations - Psych....

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