Humanistic Psychology - Maslow

Humanistic Psychology - Maslow - Psych. 2000 - Humanistic...

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Psych. 2000 -- Humanistic Psychology Abraham Maslow’s The Farther Reaches of Human Nature Read: pp. 24 - 68, 270 - 286 First, some general ideas Differences from Rogers -- Not as therapeutically oriented -- More emphasis on motivation , also personality . Like Rogers -- a big emphasis on personal growth, conceived in terms of Most famous for Maslow’s HIERARCHY OF NEEDS
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Another Big Idea - a basic way of viewing motivation, growth, etc. B-needs vs. D-needs B here stands for “Being” -- the need to fulfill one’s being by moving toward self-actualization. Also, growing and seeking out what’s fulfilling for its own sake, rather than as a way of meeting some deficiency in life -- a kind of “positive” motivation. D here stands for “Deficiency” -- the need to address deficiencies. Also, being motivated by what’s missing in life -- a kind of “negative” motivation. Maslow also makes similar distinctions in other areas of life:
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B-values vs. D-values B-cognitions vs. D-cognitions For example, B-love vs. D-love B-love would be about a kind of love motivated by desire for the fulfillment of one’s own and the other’s lives. D-love would be about a kind of love motivated by need to address deficiencies in one’s life, such as feeling unloved, not feeling appreciated, not feeling sexually satisfied, etc. ------------------------------------ Ch. 2 --“Neurosis as a Failure of Personal Growth” Like Rogers “pathology” seen in terms of someone’s way of being - rather than in medical terms. Maslow tries to provide an alternative conception. In general, humanistic psychology agitates against MEDICAL MODEL conceptions of psychological disturbance (p. 24) (although Maslow argues that his approach is not dichotomously opposed to the med. model - p.29) Medical Model - DSM-IV American Psychiatric Association Psychological suffering - seen as a kind of “disease” or “disorder,” (symptoms produced by antecedent causes etiology ). Point find the causes & treat them (via “therapy”). Humanistic View Most psychological suffering is intimately bound up with who you are -- so much so that it becomes problematic to distinguish between cause & effect. (where does the cause end and the effect begin?)
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The point is to address the entire person and to seek change at that level. So, Maslow views pathology in terms of “Blockages to one’s full humanness.” (I.e., one‘s full potential as a psychological being). Part of the problem with medical model: It tend to be dehumanizing People seen more as batches of symptoms, test results, etc. (a kind of reduction). In other words, it tends to passes over people’s deep and unique humanity what makes a person unique, valuable in the first place. It tends to be too NORMALIZING
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Humanistic Psychology - Maslow - Psych. 2000 - Humanistic...

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