Hume - An Enquiry Concerning Human

Hume - An Enquiry Concerning Human - David Hume (1711-1776)...

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David Hume (1711-1776) An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (pp 599-634)
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Section I (Of the Different Species of Philosophy) ‘Moral philosophy’ is the science of human nature: That concerned with human action (taste and sentiment) That concerned with reasoning
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Despite how readily available the activity of the mind is to us, we still are unable to draw clear distinctions. “It becomes, therefore, no inconsiderable part of science barely to know the different operations of the mind, to separate them from each other, to class them under their proper heads, and to correct all that seeming disorder, in which they lie involved, when made the object of reflexion and enquiry.”
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Hume thus aims to undermine abstruse philosophy by grounding his enquiry in empirical observation, and by explaining the possibility of such observation. “Happy, if we can unite the boundaries of the different species of philosophy, by reconciling profound enquiry with clearness, and truth with novelty! And still more happy, if, reasoning in this easy manner, we can undermine the foundations of an abstruse philosophy, which seems to have hitherto served only as a shelter to superstition, and a cover to absurdity and error!”
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Section II (Of the Origin of Ideas) Perceptions of the mind Thoughts or ideas: to think of something; dependent on an impression or collection of impressions. Impressions: more forceful and vivacious than ideas. Capacity to have ideas is proportional to the capacity to have sensations (impressions).
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Section III (Of the Association of Ideas) All ideas are connected with some other idea. “Were the looses and freest conversation to be transcribed, there would immediately be observed something which connected it in all its transitions.” Three principles of relation between ideas Resemblance: with one another Contiguity: in time or place Cause/Effect: one idea being logically prior or ancillary to another.
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Section IV (Sceptical Doubts Concerng the Operations of the Understanding) Part I Two kinds of objects of human reason/judgment Relations of ideas: mathematical sciences or every affirmation which is intuitively or demonstrably certain. These are judgments that do not require direct reference to experience: demonstrative reasoning. “Propositions of this kind are discoverable by the mere operation of thought, without dependence on what is anywhere existent in the universe.” These judgments are indicative of demonstrative reasoning; they’re truths are analytic.
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Matters of fact: non-mathematical sciences, or every affirmation that is not necessarily true, but could be otherwise (e.g., false). These are judgments about the world and as such, the
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Hume - An Enquiry Concerning Human - David Hume (1711-1776)...

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