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COURSE CODE: SHS 437COURSE NAME: DIETETICS ILECTURE 9
Disorders of Lower GIT
Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to learn aboutDifferentdisordersofLowerGastrointestinal Tract and their MedicalNutrition therapy.
IntroductionNutrition status and the digestive tract areinextricably linked.Dietary interventions for many diseases ofthe intestinal tract are designed primarily toalleviate symptoms and to correct nutrientdeficiencies
Intestinal Gas and FlatulenceThe daily volume of human intestinal gas is about200 ml.These gases are either expelled through belching(eructation) or passed rectally (flatus).
Intestinal gases include carbon dioxide (CO2),oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), hydrogen (H2),and sometimes methane (CH4).Foods that produce gas in one person may notcause gas in someone else, depending on themix of microorganisms in the individual’s colon.
Normally, theconcentration of bacteriain thesmall intestine is significantly lower than thatfound in the colon.Various conditions can lead to overgrowth ofbacteria in the small intestine causing bloating,distention, nausea, diarrhea, or other symptoms.
Medical Nutrition TherapyWhen evaluating a patient, clinicians mustinvestigate and differentiate between increasedproduction of gas and gas that is not beingpassed
Keeping a food diary to track eating habitsand symptoms may help identify specificfoods that cause gas.
If milk or milk products are causing gas, apatient is evaluated for lactose intoleranceand advised to avoid milk products for ashort time to see if symptoms improve.
A sudden change in diet, such as adrasticincrease in fiber intake, also can alter gasproduction.Specific foods that containraffinose(a complexsugar resistant to digestion) such as beans,cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, asparagus,and some whole grains can increase gasproduction

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Term
Summer
Professor
NoProfessor
Tags
Gastroenterology, Digestive System

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