Sample_Final_Exam_with_answers

Sample_Final_Exam_with_answers - Questions 1 21 are from...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Questions 1 – 21 are from the last ¼ of the course . Questions #1-4 refer to the following information. Two species of chipmunks occupy distinct elevational zones on mountains in Arizona. Species A occupies elevations from 1000-2000 meters, while Species B occupies elevational zones from 2000 meters to the top of the mountains. A biologist states “Species A does not occupy zones where Species B occurs because of interspecific competition”. 1. This statement is a (an): a. hypothesis b. prediction c. conclusion d. experiment e. causal question 2. The biologist then states “If Species B prevents Species A from occupying higher elevational zones, and Species B is removed, then Species A should move into higher elevational zones”. This statement is a (an): a. hypothesis b. prediction c. conclusion d. experiment e. causal question 3. The biologist then removes species B from higher elevations (2000-3000 m elevation), and compares the densities of Species A in areas where Species B was removed to areas where Species B was not removed. "Density" refers to the number of individuals per unit area. In the areas where Species B was removed, densities of Species A are 24.6 chipmunks per hectare, while in the control areas (no removal), densities of Species A are 0.2 chipmunks per hectare. The best conclusion from this experiment is: a. interspecific competition limits the distribution of Species B to higher elevations b. interspecific competition limits the distribution of Species A to lower elevations c. Species A and B equally affect each other’s distribution d. Species A and B have no effect on each other’s distribution e. predation limits the distribution of Species A to lower elevations 4. In a final series of observations, the biologist observes that Species A and B eat different types of seeds, and have similar physiological tolerances, but Species B aggressively defends and attacks individuals of Species A when individuals of Species A attempt to move to higher elevational zones. These observations suggest that: a. interference competition by Species B is limiting the distribution of Species A to lower elevations b. the lower elevation limit of Species A is determined by predation c. the lower elevation limit of Species A is determined by physiological tolerances d. exploitative competition by Species B limits distribution of A to lower elevations e. the lower elevation limit of Species B is determined by predation 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
5. In Saguaro cacti, large wounds in the plant tissues (called rots) are first colonized by bacteria and yeasts. Drosophila flies only colonize after yeasts and bacteria because they feed on these microorganisms and flies cannot not feed directly on the rotting tissues. In terms of mechanisms, this succession of microorganisms to flies best exemplifies: a. competition b. herbivory c. inhibition d. facilitation e. parasitism 6. A biologist hypothesizes that an ant species living in hollow thorns in acacia trees is cheating (acting
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/27/2008 for the course BIO 188 taught by Professor Capco during the Spring '08 term at ASU.

Page1 / 11

Sample_Final_Exam_with_answers - Questions 1 21 are from...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online