{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

zoology notes 7 - CHAPTER 9 ARCHITECTURAL PATTERN OF AN...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHAPTER 9 ARCHITECTURAL PATTERN OF AN ANIMAL
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction 32 major phyla of living multicellular animals. 500 million years ago 100 phyla had evolved representing nearly all major modern body plans. Major body plans are the result of extensive selection and are a limiting determinant of future adaptational variants. Animals share structural complexities that reflect common ancestry.
Background image of page 2
A. Levels of Organization Protoplasmic Grade Unicellular organisms All life processes confined within the boundaries of a single cell Organelles perform specialized functions. Protozoans (amoeba, euglena)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cellular Grade Organism is composed of a variety of cells that form a specific function These cells cannot live alone as do protozoan cells. Simplest metazoans (multicellular animals) show a cellular grade of organization. No tissues Poriferans (sponges)
Background image of page 4
Tissue Grade More complex metazoans exhibit a tissue grade organization Tissue: Groups of similar cells working together to perform a specific function. Cnidarians (Hydra, Corals)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Organ Grade Specialized organs perform specific functions.
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}