The Lottery hw

The Lottery hw - their friends and family members. Jackson...

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Marco Emadzadeh Wrt 201-064 “The Lottery” Shirley Jackson Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” takes place in a small village which consists of only three hundred people. All these people gather for a yearly ceremony held in a public area. There, a man holds a black box which consists of pieces of paper that have written on them a name from every family. One by one, in alphabetical order, each family is called and given their piece of paper. They are not allowed to look at the paper until everyone has one. This tradition has been going for many years, longer than the oldest man in town. After each family has a piece of paper, they all open it and view the inside. One paper contains a black dot in it. That family goes up again writes their names on individual papers and again their names are selected. The person who is selected or “awarded” will have the privilege of public stoning by everyone in the town, including
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Unformatted text preview: their friends and family members. Jackson creates nonchalance and accepted presence throughout the town, as if the tradition should be regarded as normal. The children are laughing and playing; the women are conversing and gossiping, the day is bright and sunny. This controversial ritual is most likely used to depict the evil within human nature. Jackson is trying to say that although people may seem to be righteous and human, there may be a hidden evil lurking within them. It can also symbolize selfishness, because in one point, one of the characters was not upset when her family was called, only when her own name was called. For one to be only concerned for themselves and not the lives of a family member is neither socially acceptable nor humane....
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This note was uploaded on 04/27/2008 for the course WRT 101 taught by Professor Stevens during the Spring '08 term at WPUNJ.

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