Syllabus102.033Summer2015 - MargaretBundy ENGL102.033 MTW:12:15pm2:05pm Room:LA105 ,Summer2016 [email protected] OfficeLocation:EA201B

Syllabus102.033Summer2015 - MargaretBundy ENGL102.033...

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Unformatted text preview: Margaret Bundy ENGL 102.033 MTW: 12:15pm­ 2:05pm Room: LA 105 Boise State University, Summer 2016 [email protected] Office Location: EA­201B Office Hours: TW, 11:00am­ 11:45am Course Description: Welcome to English 102! ​ ​ In English 102 we will be emphasizing inquiry as a path to research. We’ll investigate not only how research writing may be used to communicate ideas, but also how it may be used to discover and create them as well. We will be looking at the range of purposes, genres, and audiences that people research and write for. We’ll write to think through, into, and around ideas—abilities essential for your work in academia and beyond. This course invites you to experience first­hand the role of writer and researcher as you work to collect research, interpret your findings, and present them to others. Research and Writing Expect to use and examine how, when, where, and why you use different genres in writing and research. Rather than asking you to look at multiple topics over the next seven weeks, you will select one topic to work with in multiple genres throughout the semester. BSU’s First­Year Writing Program has listed goals for English 102 students. These goals are that, by the end of 102, students will demonstrate that they are able to: ● understand academic work as a recursive process of inquiry, using writing and research to form new questions and pursue existing enduring questions; ● craft questions that guide research, making their process manageable and likely to yield insights; ● find, read, evaluate, analyze, and synthesize appropriate sources; ● integrate evidence in their own writing in a way that complicates (develops, refines, extends, refutes, and deepens) their own ideas; ● produce research­based writing in formats appropriate to the context, purpose, genre, and audience; ● implement a variety of research strategies and resources as appropriate to their inquiry; ● use a variety of media (print and digital) to address different audiences, as appropriate; ● understand genre expectations for some research­based writing contexts within the university; ● use an academic documentation style consistently and appropriately; ● articulate the rhetorical choices they have made as a writer and researcher, illustrating their awareness of a writer’s relationship to the subject, context, purpose, and audience; ● produce prose without surface­level convention errors that distract readers from attending to the meaning and purpose of the writing. Required Texts Various readings and course documents posted to Blackboard and/or distributed in class. Instead of a course textbook, you will be responsible for printing and/or accessing these documents. Technology Access: English 102 assumes that you will have access to a computer beyond this classroom (Google Drive, Blackboard, etc.). ​ Please contact me immediately if you foresee technology access as a problem​ . A flash drive: you need to be sure to backup all your work. Expectations Please remember that by staying in this course, you’re agreeing to these expectations. Workload and Collaboration​ : This class is founded on the principle that you learn best by working with ideas and writing and thinking. Class meetings will be workshop­style format, whether we’re meeting to discuss each other’s writing, to share ideas, or to work with or from a reading. This class asks that you be very ​ present​ in mind and body, for each class meeting; what you bring to each class session is really important! Recognize that writing in this class is going to take time. Most college courses expect two to three hours of work (each week) outside the class for each credit hour. Because this course has been condensed into seven weeks, the normal nine hours/week you would spend on class engagement, research, and writing time may not be enough. Be prepared to commit to your research and this course. Remember:​ Emails are a formal discourse; please be respectful and clear. For more information about how to compose emails, please visit: Writing and Reflection​ : You will do a lot of low­risk writing that will build into a larger research project. Remember to see these writing pieces as building blocks to a greater goal­­ there is no such thing as a perfect first draft. Throughout the semester, there will be three writing units and the final portfolio. Writing Project 1: Inquiry Proposal Writing Project 2: Exploratory Research: An Annotated Bibliography Writing Project 3: Cumulative Research Readings​ : "Thinking in Print," Booth et al; "From Questions to a Problem," Booth et al; “Looking for Trouble,” Savini; and others as assigned. Readings​ : "From Problems to Sources," Booth et al; “Reading Games,” Rosenberg; "Engaging Sources," Booth et al; samples; and others as assigned Readings​ : "Making Good Arguments," Booth et al; "Making Claims," Booth et al; samples; and others as assigned Genre: Inquiry, exploratory Genre: Citations, research Genre: Argument, digital Rhetorical Strategy: Allow your questions to drive your research, rather than your opinion. Formulate some inquiry questions, and invite your audience to explore this topic with you. (pathos) Rhetorical Strategy: Formulate research questions, and showcase your secondary research through this structured genre. Question the texts you include, and be sure to indicate how they may or may not work together. (logos) Rhetorical Strategy: Establish authority by incorporating other voices to support your ideas. Use words, images, etc. to move your reader through your text. Make an argument based on primary and secondary research. (ethos) Your daily assignments will be posted to Blackboard. As the course progresses and you grow as writers, we can be sure to align the best readings and in­class writing assignments to help you reach your full potential. For information on each unit, visit Blackboard or refer to your unit sheets. Feedback and Draft Rating: To help you make decisions about revision, I will provide you feedback on each pre­portfolio draft you submit, including a rating of 2­5 for each draft: 5­ Draft is portfolio ready 4­ Middle to late stage draft in need of targeted revision 3­ Early stage draft meeting minimum requirements but needs further exploration and revision 2­ Draft clearly does not meet assignment requirements This rating is not a grade. You will receive completion points for each draft you complete. This rating, along with feedback from me and your peers, will help you decide which information to include for your final research project and how to revise your research moving forward. Final Portfolio​ : Again, this course approaches writing through process learning. You’ll notice the final portfolio is wortha lot of points. This is because you have most of the semester to work: editing, revising, rewriting, etc. Constructing a ten­page paper in one day is never going to showcase your best work. This course allows you to review and revise along the way until your final submission. We will discuss this further in class, but keep this in mind throughout the semester, and remember to revise and edit your writing often. Assessment and Evaluation Grading Policy: Informal Assignments 60 points Participation 60 points Each Unit (there will be three) 60 points (20/each unit) Note: Full credit will only be awarded to those who have completed and turned in all of the work for the assignment. Otherwise, partial credit or no credit will be given. Final Portfolio 120 points 300 points *Grading Policy Note: ​ You ​ must​ submit all three unit assignments in order to pass this course. Policies Public Nature of the Classroom​ : Please consider ​ all​ writing you do for this class to be "public.” Part of becoming an effective writer is learning to appreciate the ideas and criticisms of others; in this course, our purpose is to come together as a writing community. Remember that you will often be expected to share your writing with others. Avoid writing about topics that you may not be prepared to subject to public scrutiny or that you feel so strongly about that you are unwilling to listen to perspectives other than your own. Additionally, the feedback that is provided is intended to help you improve your writing; be open to the suggestions from other writers. Participation Policy:​ Class attendance is vital to this course. Participation in class discussions, in­class activities, completing and annotating the assigned readings, and actively working during peer­reviews, is expected in order to receive full participation points. Participation is more heavily weighted in this course because process is a key aspect to our learning outcomes; every assignment will aid in the development of the unit projects and the growth of knowledgeable writers. I will keep track of your class participation. If you are present and actively participating in class, you will receive a + for the day; if you are not participating, but you are there, you will receive a ­ for the day; if you are not present, you will receive an x for the day. I do not expect to see many minuses. If you do not actively participate for one, full­week of class (three days), you will lose ​ at least​ half of the participation points. I take attendance and record grades; I will email you twice/semester to update you on your attendance record. Formal grades can be accessed through Blackboard. Late Work: ​ Papers are due at the beginning of every due date. Late unit projects must be turned in within a week of the due date in order to receive any credit. Due to time­constraints, late final portfolios ​ will not​ be accepted. If an emergency arises and you fear you won’t meet a deadline, contact me ​ before​ the work is due. Absentees: ​ You have two unofficial absentees before your grade will be affected (although you will still be expected to make­up missed work). Only official absences will be excused (Jury Duty, Military Duty, and formal university activities, all of which will be accompanied by a formal letter); however, be sure to notify me of an absence ahead of time so that we can plan accordingly. ​ Note: papers are still due on time, even if you’re absent. For a seven­week course that meets three times a week, any student who misses four or more classes is subject to fail the course. Again, this is a workshop based course; we all participate daily in class, so showing up late and/or being absent will negatively affect your grade and your First Year Writing experience. Basic Rules for the Road: ● Come to class. Be present in class­­ this means actively participating and working. ● Be on time. Tardiness is a sign of disrespect in this culture. Extreme tardiness is considered as an absence. ● Please keep cellphones out of sight. This is an academic setting­­ cellphone use is unacceptable in this space. ● Please feel free to bring mobile devices to work; however, be respectful of me and your fellow students. If you are distracted, you will lose participation points. If you are disruptive, you will be asked to leave. Academic Honesty: ​ I expect that you all want to employ high standards of academic honesty. However, I also understand that this course may be challenging at times. Please feel free to contact me with any questions regarding citations and/or integrating sources into your texts. If I notice minor source misuse, I will note that and we will conference so that you may revise your work. Blatant plagiarism­­ turning in someone else’s work as your own; using large portions of work from others without citing it­­ is not acceptable and could result in failure of an assignment, failure of the course, or suspension/expulsion from the university. Contact me if you are confused by an assignment or unsure if you are plagiarising a text. Other sources that you might turn to are: ​ ​ for help with MLA and APA citations, and/or: Boise State University Policy Manual​ , ​ Boise State University Student Handbook ​ for questions regarding the Boise State University academic standards. Writing and Learning Support If you are unsure about an assignment, concerned about your writing, or you simply need help, please feel free to contact me. I am more than happy to help with your writing. Stop by my office hours, make an appointment, or email me with specific questions. Please allow at least 48 hours for an email response before following up; however, I will respond to emails as quickly as possible. Also, the Boise State University Writing Center is fantastic. It is ​ free​ for all students. It is a great resource for you to use at any stage in your writing. The Writing Center phone number is 208.426.1298 and it’s located at LA 200. The Writing Center’s website is: ​ . Make an appointment ahead of time, and be sure to bring your assignment, as well as, any draft work along with you. Disability Resources: ​ BSU complies with all federal and state laws and regulations regarding discrimination, including the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). If you have a disability and need accommodation for equal access to education at BSU, please call Disability Resource Center for Students 208.426.1583. Once you have acquired necessary paperwork, feel free to discuss needed accommodations with me. All Information regarding disability is confidential. Student Behavior​ : The rules and regulations of Boise State University “Code of Conduct” will be followed in our classroom. You can find it here: ​ Student Code of Conduct​ . Any behavior considered unbecoming or inappropriate for a collegiate atmosphere, will result in your dismissal from this class. While I support academic freedom, I expect businesslike behavior from you. Students are entitled to receive instruction free from interference by other members of the class. Weapons Policy​ : Idaho law permits concealed carry of firearms on the Boise State University campus by some students, faculty, staff, and visitors. Other than qualified law enforcement officers, only persons who have been issued and are in possession of an Idaho enhanced concealed carry license are permitted to do so. Firearms must remain concealed at all times. If a firearm becomes visible it is a violation of university policy and the person may be removed from campus. Please notify Boise State Campus Security (call 208­426­6911) or the Boise Police Department (call 9­1­1) for any reports of firearms on campus. Use of firearms is prohibited on campus​ . Expectations:​ Finally, it is​ my responsibility​ to do the best I can to aid in your learning and writing this semester. It is ​ your responsibility ​ to invest in your education and come to me if you need help. If you’re confused, but you don’t ask questions, it will be much more difficult for me to help you. Contact me ​ before​ an assignment is due if you have any questions whatsoever. I’m always willing to brainstorm ideas, explain an assignment further, and discuss your work with you at any stage. Important Dates: June 30: Last date to drop without a “W” July 4: Independence Day, no classes July 5: Unit One July 18: Unit Two July 27: Last date to drop with a “W” August 1: Unit Three August 11: Final Portfolio As a piece of writing, this text is subject to change and revision. ...
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  • Spring '08
  • ErikLevitt
  • English, Writer, Boise State University, Booth et al

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