Alzheimer - Alzheimer's Disease We don't have all the...

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    Alzheimer’s Disease   We don’t have all the answers, but we  have some.
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    Alzheimer’s vs. Dementia Not the same thing. Dementia is a clinical condition. Alzheimer’s CAUSES dementia. Other diseases cause dementia, too. (Medications/treatments for ONE cause of  dementia don’t help ALL causes of  dementia)
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    Alzheimer’s Disease First described in 1906 or 1907 by Alois  Alzheimer, a German neurologist. Brain disease:  The brain develops growths of  abnormal proteins:  Amyloid plaques  between nerve cells  (neurons) in the brain.   Neurofibrillary tangles  are within nerve cells. The plaques and tangles keep the nerves from  functioning normally.
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    Plaques and Tangles
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    How many people have this disease? What ages of people? Scientists think that as many as 4.5  million Americans suffer from AD. The number of people with the disease  doubles every 5 years beyond age 65.
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    Is it rare for younger adults to develop this disease? Yes. Usually begins after age 60, and risk goes up  with age.  While younger people also may get AD, it is  much less common.  About 5 percent of men and women ages 65 to  74 have AD, and nearly half of those age 85  and older may have the disease.  AD is not a normal part of aging. 
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    What causes it? We don’t know for sure.  Age  is the most important known risk factor for  AD.  Family history  is another risk factor.  Familial AD , a rare form of AD that usually occurs  between the ages of 30 and 60, can be inherited.  Sporadic AD  is far more common (90% of all AD)
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    Causes May be increased genetic risk of  developing  sporadic AD Can get a blood test for this - but it’s only  a RISK factor. Not a for-sure cause. Research also looking at education, diet,  environment, and viruses to determine a  cause for Alzheimer’s.
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    How close are we to a cure? Research has focused on genetics, 
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This note was uploaded on 04/27/2008 for the course COMM 72.152 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '07 term at Bloomsburg.

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Alzheimer - Alzheimer's Disease We don't have all the...

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