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contraception - Chapter 8 Contraception and Abortion...

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Chapter 8 Contraception and Abortion
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Psychological Aspects: Steps in Effective Contraception According to social psychologist Donn Byrne, there are five steps in effective contraception. 1. Must acquire and remember accurate information about contraception. 2. Must acknowledge a likelihood of engaging in sexual intercourse. 3. Must obtain contraceptive. 4. Must communicate with the partner about contraception. 5. Must actually use method of contraception.
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Psychological Aspects: Attitudes Toward Contraception Attitudes and emotions play an important role in making a person more or less likely to use contraceptives effectively. Erotophobes don’t discuss sex, have sex lives that are influenced by guilt and fear of social disapproval, have intercourse infrequently with few partners, and are shocked by sexually explicit films. Erotophiles are just the opposite and are more likely to be consistent, reliable contraceptive users.
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Why not use contraception?
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Effectiveness Measures Failure Rate If 5 women out of 100 become pregnant during a year of using contraceptive A, then A’s failure rate is 5%. Perfect user vs. typical user failure rates Effectiveness = 100 - failure rate Contraceptive A is 95% effective
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The Pill: Combination Pills Combination birth control pills (oral contraceptives) such as Loestrin and Ovcon, contain estrogen and progestin. Higher levels of estrogen inhibit FSH production, so the message to ovulate is never sent. Higher levels of progestin keep cervical mucus very thick, making it difficult for sperm to get through. The use of combination pills is one of the most effective methods of birth control.
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The Pill: Other Types of Pills Varying levels of estrogen and progestin Most women do best with no more than 30 to 35 micrograms estrogen. Triphasic pill (Ortho Tri-Cyclen) - three phases in progestin levels. Progestin-only pills (Micronor, Nor-Q-D, and Ovrette) - also called mini-pills.
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The Pill: Side Effects Serious side effects associated with use of the pill include: Slight but significant increases in certain diseases of the circulatory system.
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