ap_journals-2 - Teacher Mr Thomas Course AP English Literature and Composition Study Aides 3-Cs Rhetorical Journal Poetry Annotation Dialectical Journal

ap_journals-2 - Teacher Mr Thomas Course AP English...

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Teacher: Mr. Thomas Course: AP English Literature and Composition Study Aides: 3-C’s, Rhetorical Journal, Poetry Annotation, Dialectical Journal Date: First Semester AP ENGLISH STUDY GUIDE T his packet contains all the information required for the assignments required in your Final Portfolio. It gives instruction and examples for assignments you will be expected to do. In addition, it provides the terms you will be accountable to know (related to the Literary and Rhetorical Devices), and a schedule for when they have to be finished. Keep this journal in your portfolio. If you need a working copy to carry with you, feel free to photocopy the material, but you will need a clean copy for your Final Portfolio, inasmuch as you will frequently need help with terminology, definitions, annotation, and organization.
Literary Devices Below you will find a list of 84 Terms for which you must create study cards. Accompanying the terms is a schedule for their completion (you will have four weeks before we study poetry: 4/84 = 21 per week). Though they will not be collected until the end of the four weeks, some terms may wind up on quizzes. Of primary importance : KNOWING the terms is the FIRST STEP. The AP Exam does not ask for definitions; they expect students to see the devices in context. Therefore, your cards must follow a certain pattern: 1) SIDE 1 – Term 2) SIDE 2 – a. Definition b. Sentence: using device in context POETRY TERMS WEEK 1 alliteration allusion ambiguity anapest , anapestic antithesis approximate rhyme (see slant rhyme) assonance aubade audience ballad blank verse cacophony caesura carpe diem conceit connotation consonance couplet dactyl, dactylic denotation diction WEEK 2 dimeter dramatic monologue dramatic situation elegy end rhyme end-stopped line English sonnet aka Shakespearean enjambment epithet euphony exact rhyme extended metaphor feminine rhyme foot free verse hexameter hyperbole iamb, iambic imagery implied metaphor internal rhyme WEEK 3 irony Italian sonnet (aka Petrarchan Sonnet) litotes lyric poem masculine rhyme metaphor metaphysical poetry meter metonymy monometer narrative poem octave ode onomatapoeia oxymoron paradox parallelism pentameter personification phonetic intensives WEEK 4 quatrain rhetorical question rhyme scheme run-on line (enjambment) scansion sestet simile slant rhyme (approximate or near rhyme) sonnet speaker spondee, spondaic stanza synecdoche syntax tercet tetrameter theme tone trimester trochee, trochaic villanelle
Rhetorical Devices Great writing and excellent reading come from an understanding of syntax. Syntax is created out of different literary structures listed below. Though you will not be required to know the definitions of each of these terms (they will not do you much good in life), recognizing a difference in sentence pattern can put you way ahead for the AP Exam.

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