Chapter 04 - CHAPTER 4 CulturalCrossroads CONCEPT MAP I....

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CHAPTER 4Cultural CrossroadsCONCEPT MAPI.Defining CultureA.EthnocentrismB.Cultural RelativismII.Components of CultureA.Material CultureB.Symbolic CultureC.Forms of CommunicationD.The Sapir-Whorf HypothesisE.Values, Norms, and SanctioningIII.Cultural VariationA.Dominant CultureB.SubculturesC.CounterculturesD.Culture WarsE.Ideal and Real CultureIV.High and Low CultureA.PolysemyB.The Business of CultureV.Cultural ChangeA.TechnologyB.Cultural Diffusion and LevelingC.Cultural ImperialismTRUE/FALSE QUESTIONS1.Sociologists claim that culture is the lens through which we perceive and evaluate what is going on around us.NOT: Factual
DIF: EasyREF: Page 96OBJ: Defining Culture (I)2.Culture is the total way of life of a group of people.NOT: Factual
DIF: EasyREF: Page 96OBJ: Defining Culture (I)3.Even when sociologists study their own cultures, they often still engage in the process of “othering” the people that they study.
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Chapter 7 / Exercise 3
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NOT: Factual
DIF: EasyREF: Page 97OBJ: Defining Culture (I)4.When sociologists study culture, they need to emphasize the exceptional and unusual and avoid studying the mundane or everyday.NOT: Factual
DIF: EasyREF: Page 97OBJ: Defining Culture (I)5.Culture shock is almost never useful in helping sociologists to see that even what is most familiar to us can be bizarre.NOT: Factual
DIF: EasyREF: Page 98OBJ: Ethnocentrism (I.A)6.When we try to understand a culture on its own terms, we are practicing cultural relativism.NOT: Factual
DIF: EasyREF: Page 98OBJ: Cultural Relativism (I.B)7.Cultural relativism and ethnocentrism are extremely similar concepts.NOT: Conceptual
DIF: EasyREF: Page 98OBJ: Cultural Relativism (I.B)8.Gestures, language, values, norms, sanctions, folkways, and mores are all examples of symbolic culture.NOT: Factual
DIF: EasyREF: Page 101OBJ: Symbolic Culture (II.B)9.Although languages differ considerably from one culture to another, the meanings of gestures are commonly understood in the same way by people throughout the world.NOT: Factual
DIF: EasyREF: Pages 101–102OBJ: Symbolic Culture (II.B)10.Values and norms are symbolic culture in action.NOT: Factual
DIF: EasyREF: Page 104OBJ: Symbolic Culture (II.B)11.Conflict about the values and norms of a society always comes from the margins of society.NOT: Factual
DIF: MediumREF: Pages 104, 110OBJ: Values, Norms, and Sanctioning (II.E)12.Negative sanctions can only be imposed by an authoritative body or formal institution.

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Term
Fall
Professor
online
Tags
Sociology, Ethnocentrism, Norms, REF, Folkway
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Essentials of Psychology: Concepts and Applications
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Chapter 7 / Exercise 3
Essentials of Psychology: Concepts and Applications
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