Lec01 - Lecture 1-1 Physics 241 Electricity and Optics...

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Lecture 1-1 Physics 241: Electricity and Optics Lecture 0201 Lecturer: Prof. Hisao Nakanishi Lectures: Room PHYS112 11:30 – 12:20 (TTh) Office: PHYS Room 264 Office Hours: After class or Appt. Phone: 494-5522 Email: [email protected] Textbook: Physics for Scientists and Engineers (5 th edition), Parts 2A & 2B by Paul A. Tipler and Gene Mosca Exams: 2 evening hour exams and a two-hour final exam Quizzes: during lectures Homework: CHIP (26 assignments) Course Web Page:: http://www.physics.purdue.edu/phys241/ Lecture 0101 Lecturer: Prof. Nick Giordano Lectures: Room PHYS112 11:30 – 12:20 (TTh) Office: PHYS Room 62 Office Hours: After class or Appt. Phone: 494-6418 Email: [email protected]
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Lecture 1-2 Charging by rubbing
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Lecture 1-3 Charging by induction grounding polarization by induction
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Lecture 1-4
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Lecture 1-5 (Static) Electric Charge Electric charge is an intrinsic property of the fundamental particles that every atom is made of, and thus of any object in nature. Electric charge states: • negative (electrons, e.g.) • positive (protons, etc) • neutral (neutrons, etc) Obtaining net electric charges getting or losing charged particles For instance, friction can cause electrons to move from one object to another.
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Lecture 1-6 Quantization of Charge Fundamental unit: elementary charge e , 3 , 2 , 1 , ± ± ± = = n ne q An electron carries a charge of –e ; a proton carries a charge of +e It is typically the electrons that move between objects.
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