Readings - Overview The readings will cover a period in American history when support for the protection of nature and natural resources evolvedthe

Readings - Overview The readings will cover a period in...

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Overview The readings will cover a period in American history when support for the protection of nature and natural resources evolved—the mid-to-late 19th century and the early 20th century. In the material you will discover a rationale for a Conservation Movement, philosophies for managing nature and natural resources, establishment of the nation’s first national park, leaders of the movement to protect resources, controversies surrounding protection—Hetch-Hetchy, and the eventual establishment of two federal agencies to manage the public domain. Time Estimate The readings should take 12-15 hours to complete. Readings Read the following from our textbook. All of these are required activities for this week. Nash, R. (2014). Wilderness and the American Mind (5th edition). New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Chapters 7, 8, 9, and 10, pp. 108-181. John Muir Gifford Pinchot Instructions Keep your eyes open for the following key terms or phrases as you complete the readings. These topics will help you better understand the content in this lesson. Evolution of the conservation movementSome people opposed the protection of wilderness by saying like “why should we favor the retention of a few buffaloes to the development of mining interests amounting to millions of dollars.” However, finally the vote for the railroad’s application was turned down. Supporters said that we should protect “a region for Americans who desired to see “primeval nature, simple and pure.”Murray declared: “the wilderness provides that perfect relaxation which all jaded minds require.”The popularity of the Adirondacks focused attention on the disappearance of their wilderness qualities. The idea of preservation followed.To the wild forests in the Adirondacks was equivalent to “tampering with the goose that lays the golden eggs.” The Commission also observed that a park would provide “a place where rest, recuperation and vigor may be gained by our highly nervous and overworked
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