Paper 2 - John Abrusci PHRU 1000 Philosophy of Human Nature...

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John Abrusci PHRU 1000 Philosophy of Human Nature Paper #2: Immortality of the Soul Defending the Immortality of the Soul In this paper, I will prove the immortality of the soul by using Plato’s Theory of Recollection and Argument from Opposites. I will proceed with a fourth-step method. First, I will explain Plato’s objectives and his Theory of Recollection and Argument from Opposites. Second, I will explain the arguments against the immortality of the soul. Third, I will explain Plato’s defense of the immortality of the soul. Fourth, I will explain my own argument for the immortality of the soul that compliments Plato’s argument. In order to understand the problem of the soul’s immortality, one must first understand Plato’s ideas of what becomes of the soul after death. Plato sets out to accomplish two tasks. First, he must prove that the soul pre-existed the body. Second, he must prove that the soul continues to exist after the body ceases to exist. After proving those points, Plato will have successfully proved the immortality of the soul. It is crucial to understand two important arguments that Plato uses in his defense of the soul’s immortality. The first is his Theory of Recollection. Plato’s belief is that one learns what he calls the forms through recollection. In simpler terms, one possesses all of his or her knowledge before existence and recollects it when the knowledge must be put into use. For example, when one attempts to perform a mathematical operation, the numbers and symbols of the equation remind him or her, and he or she recollects the answer to the problem. The argument for the Theory of Recollection proceeds as follows: if we know
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the forms, then either we learn them on earth, or we learn them off of earth; we know the forms, therefore either we learn them on earth or off of earth; we do not learn them on earth, so we must learn them off of earth; if we learn the forms off of earth, then we recollect them, and since we do learn the forms off of earth, we must therefore recollect them. The second of Plato’s important arguments is his Argument from Opposites. Plato
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This note was uploaded on 04/27/2008 for the course PHRU 1000 taught by Professor Murphy during the Spring '06 term at Fordham.

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Paper 2 - John Abrusci PHRU 1000 Philosophy of Human Nature...

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