standardspaper - Standards Comparison 1 Measuring Up How Do...

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Standards Comparison 1 Measuring Up: How Do Third Grade Language Arts Standards Compare Between Michigan and Indiana? Megan Thie Teacher Education 301 Meagan Shedd October 3, 2007
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Standards Comparison 2 Measuring Up: How Do Third Grade Language Arts Standards Compare Between Michigan and Indiana? Almost twenty one years ago, I was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. By that point, my mother been teaching for twelve years and served as President of the National Educators Association. I guess one could say that teaching has always been in my blood. My mom is my best friend and soon to be my most admired colleague with her 32 years of teaching experience teaching third grade in Indianapolis. Like all mother-daughter combinations, we have our share of greatly debated issues, with the largest being where I should chose to pursue my teaching career after graduation. While I love the great state of Michigan, I have very deep roots back in Indiana. Therefore, I have chosen to compare the state standards for third grade Language Arts for the states of Michigan and Indiana. This involves the differences between the standards themselves, as well as the methods used to asses them, including standardized testing. To being to decipher the differences between the two sets of standards, I categorized the categories of the standards themselves, and created separate categories for the sub- standards. I typed these in two columns, with one for each state. The Michigan Department of Education has broken up the Grade Level Content Expectations into four main standards. These are reading, writing, speaking, and listening and viewing. Indiana State Standards for Grade 3 are divided into seven categories which are slightly more specifically organized. These are “Reading: Word Recognition, Fluency, and Vocabulary Development; Reading: Comprehension and Analysis of Nonfiction and Informational Text; Reading: Comprehension and Analysis of Literary Text; Writing: Processes and Features; Writing: Applications;
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Standards Comparison 3 Writing: English Language Conventions; and Listening and Speaking: Skills, Strategies, and Applications.” 1 Since the main standards were very similar, I chose to compare the columns side by side. This allowed me to visualize where one standard’s sub-standards, otherwise
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This note was uploaded on 04/27/2008 for the course TE 301 taught by Professor Shedd during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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standardspaper - Standards Comparison 1 Measuring Up How Do...

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