Introduction_to_Philosophy__Paper_Guidelines

Introduction_to_Philosophy__Paper_Guidelines - exactly...

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Introduction to Philosophy Paper Guidelines The topic of your paper is the debate resolution: Resolved: that the mind is identical to the brain, and every mental state is really identical to some physical state of the brain . You should argue either for or against the resolution. You should do this by discussing the strongest arguments both for and against the resolution. Present each argument clearly and precisely, and then either defend that argument, or criticize it. Here are some general guidelines for your discussion of the arguments. General Guidelines 1. State arguments clearly and precisely, distinguishing the premises from the conclusion. You do not necessarily have to number the premises, but be sure to distinguish each premise that is part of the argument. 2. In criticizing an argument, be sure to say, very clearly,
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Unformatted text preview: exactly where the argument goes wrong. That means that you should always do one of the following: (a) show that the argument is invalid, which is to say that the conclusion does not follow logically from the premises, or (b) state which premise of the argument is false, and give an argument for the conclusion that it is false. 3. In giving an original argument of your own, you should also state the argument very clearly and precisely, which means that you should identify the premises of your argument, and distinguish them from the conclusion. You should also explain why the conclusion follows from your premises. 4. Last, but certainly not least, consider the strongest possible arguments and replies on the other side of the issue (the other side from your own)....
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