Applications of RFID in Supply Chains - Gaukler and Seifert - Applications of RFID in Supply Chains Gary M Gaukler [email protected] RFID and Supply

Applications of RFID in Supply Chains - Gaukler and Seifert...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 22 pages.

Applications of RFID in Supply Chains Gary M. Gaukler [email protected] RFID and Supply Chain Systems Lab Dept. of Industrial and Systems Engineering Texas A&M University College Station, Texas 77843-3131, USA Ralf W. Seifert [email protected] IMD - International Institute for Management Development Chemin de Bellerive 23, PO Box 915 CH-1001 Lausanne, Switzerland Copyright This paper is published as a book chapter in “Trends in Supply Chain Design and Management: Technologies and Methodologies”, edited by Hosang Jung, F. Frank Chen, and Bongju Jeong, published by Springer-Verlag London Ltd. Abstract In this chapter we first give an introduction to radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology. We discuss capabilities and limitations of this technology in a supply chain setting. We then present several current applications of this technology to supply chains to demonstrate best practices and important implementation considerations. Subsequently, we discuss several issues that may hinder a wide-spread RFID implementation in supply chains. We close by deriving several consequences for a successful implementation of RFID, and we give guidance on how a company might best benefit from this technology.
Background image
2 G.M. Gaukler and R.W. Seifert 1.1 An Overview of RFID Technology At its core, RFID is a contactless interrogation method for identification of objects. Besides the applications in supply chain operations that this chapter is going to focus on, some of the everyday uses of this technology are in ID cards, sports equipment, windshield-mounted toll tags, and gasoline quick-purchase tokens. RFID has also begun to be used in keychain auto anti-theft devices and toys (most notably, Hasbro Star Wars figures), and even on paper tickets for the 2006 Soccer World Cup in Germany (Odland 2004; Want 2004). 1.1.1 RFID Hardware An RFID system essentially consists of three parts: the RFID tag itself, the RFID reader device, and a backend IT system. The RFID tag typically consists of a silicon chip that can hold a certain amount of data (such as a unique identification number), and an antenna that is used to communicate with the remote reader device. There are chipless RFID tags as well, which exploit certain RF-reflecting properties of materials. In the case of chipless RFID, the tag’s unique serial number is given by the properties of the material, e.g. the configuration of RF fibers embedded in paper. The reader device communicates with the RFID tag by means of sending and receiving radio-frequency waves. The way this communication happens differs between so-called passive and active RFID tags. Passive RFID tags do not have a power supply; the energy stored in the reader device's radio-frequency interrogation scan is enough to wake up the RFID tag and to enable it to send a response (that is, the RFID tag's data) to the reader device by means of reflection.
Background image
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 22 pages?

  • Fall '09
  • RFID

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes