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Speed of Sound Lab - Speed of Sound Lab Cycle 4 Abstract...

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Speed of Sound Lab Cycle 4 Abstract The purpose of this lab was to determine the speed of sound in air. In order to do this, we used a resonating air column at room temperature with two tuning forks of different frequencies and pitches to find resonant lengths. Through our experiment we were able to find three resonant lengths for each of the tuning forks. Wavelengths were found for all of the resonant lengths from the two tuning forks. Using these wavelengths we were able to determine the speed of sound Introduction Sir Isaac Newton was one of the first to measure the speed of sound in air. It is said that he used the period of a pendulum to see how long it took for an echo to travel down the hall at Trinity College in England. In this lab, we use a resonance tube. The fundamental harmonic in a tube occurs when L = 3λ. Therefore, a tuning fork will reach maximum volume when vibrated above a water column of length L, this is known as a resonant length. The speed of sound can then be determined if we know the frequency of
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a tuning fork and the wavelength using the equation Velocity= (Frequency)/ (Wavelength). Procedure This experiment required a tube, clamps, fleible tubing, water, a thermometer, water jug, meter stick, and two tuning forks. We began the experiment by measuring and recording the temperature of the room and radius of the tube. After the tube was filled with water, one 512-frequency tuning fork was hit on the heel of a hand and held approximately two centimeters from the open end of the tube. The tines of the fork were perpendicular to the tube. As the water level was being lowered, we listened near the edge of the tube for a sudden increase of sound intensity. At the time the sound intensity increase was heard the
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