20070905 Night Lecture 02

20070905 Night Lecture 02 - Welcome to CHM 1220/1225...

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1 Welcome to CHM 1220/1225 Please turn off cell phones pages iPods Thank you! Chapter 7 Homework Due: By 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, September 12, 2007 Recommended Exercises: all Odd numbers Practice Problems 7.29-7.63 Required Conceptual Problems: odd numbers 7.19-7.27 Practice Problems: odd numbers 7.65-7.83 Cumulative Skills Problems: 7.85, 7.89, 7.91 • Pre-lecture Assignment 02 will be available at 7:00 p.m. today and is due by 5:00 p.m., Wednesday, September 12, 2007 • Chapter 7 Quiz will be available at 2:00 p.m. today and is due by noon, Wednesday, September 12, 2007 • Chapter 7 Homework is due by 12:50 p.m. Wednesday, September 12, 2007 • Chapter 1-4 Quizzes are available and are due by noon, Monday, September 24, 2007 Chapter 7 Quantum Theory of the Atom Light Waves, Photons, and the Bohr Theory 1. The Wave Nature of Light 2. Quantum Effects and Photons 3. The Bohr Theory of the Hydrogen Atom Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Numbers 4. Quantum Mechanics 5. Quantum Numbers and Atomic Orbitals Because light behaves as a wave, we need to better understand waves.
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2 A wave is a continuously repeating change or oscillation in matter or in a physical field. Light is also a wave. – It consists of oscillations in electric and magnetic fields that travel through space. – Visible light, X rays, and radio waves are all forms of electromagnetic radiation . A wave can be characterized by its wavelength and frequency. –The wavelength, λ (lambda), is the distance between any two adjacent identical points of a wave. frequency, ν (nu) , of a wave is the number of wavelengths that pass a fixed point in one second. Figure 7.3 Water wave (ripple). The product of the frequency, ν (waves/sec) and the wavelength, λ (m/wave) will give the speed of the wave in m/s. – In a vacuum, the speed of light, c, (to three significant figures) is 3.00 x 10 8 m/s Therefore – So, given the frequency of light, its wavelength can be calculated, or vice versa. ν λ = c Figure 7.5 The electromagnetic spectrum. What is the wavelength of yellow light with a frequency of 5.09 x 10 14 s -1 ? (Note: s -1 , commonly referred to as Hertz (Hz) is defined as “cycles or waves per second”.) ?
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3 A Word on Significant Figures Always use one more digit than is required for intermediate calculations.
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This note was uploaded on 04/27/2008 for the course CHEM 1220 taught by Professor Barber during the Fall '08 term at Wayne State University.

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20070905 Night Lecture 02 - Welcome to CHM 1220/1225...

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